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PostPosted: 19 Dec 2015 12:25 am 
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lovuian wrote:
Barbarian Storm wrote:
Except for findings that originate from the native american cultures, there is not much ancient to be found in north America.
To find ancient european stuff, you need to travel to Europe.
(unless you consider the age of Vikings ancient, but it's not)


Wow
that's pretty much what Historians have told us in the past .....like Columbus discovered America ....and Columbus Day
until they discovered Leif Erickson's settlement...and now the Basque Fisherman knew about the secret fishing ground up North
no ancient civilization existed ....that's the official story line

Just to let you know Historians create myths and legends too
The Myth of Ponce de León and the Fountain of Youth
http://www.history.com/news/the-myth-of ... n-of-youth


Yeah, I build my picture pretty much on the conclusions of historians, and why shouldnt I, Lovuian?
Of course ancient civilizations existed in America, like the women and children that got slaughtered at Wounded Knee (never forget them). They had great great great grandfathers and -mothers that walked the american soil 2000 years ago. Why arent you interested in their history at all? Why do you have to bring in Europeans and invent a history that is not there?
One period of my life I lived in the midwest and I know how little you care for real history and for your "indians". In school I had classes in government, in world history, in "american"(yeah, right) history - but no one taught me about the tribes of the great plains. Why?
The Vikings in Vinland was only around briefly and left no major mark in american history whatsoever.
Unless you know of evidence that I dont know?

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PostPosted: 19 Dec 2015 1:19 am 
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Barbarian Storm wrote:
lovuian wrote:
Barbarian Storm wrote:
Except for findings that originate from the native american cultures, there is not much ancient to be found in north America.
To find ancient european stuff, you need to travel to Europe.
(unless you consider the age of Vikings ancient, but it's not)


Wow
that's pretty much what Historians have told us in the past .....like Columbus discovered America ....and Columbus Day
until they discovered Leif Erickson's settlement...and now the Basque Fisherman knew about the secret fishing ground up North
no ancient civilization existed ....that's the official story line

Just to let you know Historians create myths and legends too
The Myth of Ponce de León and the Fountain of Youth
http://www.history.com/news/the-myth-of ... n-of-youth


Yeah, I build my picture pretty much on the conclusions of historians, and why shouldnt I, Lovuian?
Of course ancient civilizations existed in America, like the women and children that got slaughtered at Wounded Knee (never forget them). They had great great great grandfathers and -mothers that walked the american soil 2000 years ago. Why arent you interested in their history at all? Why do you have to bring in Europeans and invent a history that is not there?
One period of my life I lived in the midwest and I know how little you care for real history and for your "indians". In school I had classes in government, in world history, in american history - but no one taught me about the tribes of the great plains. Why?
The Vikings in Vinland was only around briefly and left no major mark in american history whatsoever.
Unless you know evidence that I dont know?


You can build your picture anyway you want my friend
It's the viewer who can choose between what they are told they see or with their own eyes

:idea:

I do research on the Native Americans especially the Mi'kmaq Native Americans whose intermarried with the Europeans who settled in Nova Scotia
and their flag resembles the Crusader Templar one.
https://search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?hsp ... flag&type=

It's a red cross with a red pentacle and a crescent moon
What a coincidence! huh
There was a legend that Saint George had miraculously assisted Godfrey of Bouillon; also that Richard the Lionheart had placed himself under his protection.[1]

According to legend, the crusaders received miraculous help at the siege of Antioch on 28 June 1098 from a great army on white horses, clothed in white and bearing white banners, led by St George, St Demetrius, and St Mercurius. However, there was no association of the red cross with St George before the end of the crusades.

The red cross in particular was associated with the Knights Templar, from the time of the Second Crusade (1145),[3] but in 1188 red and white crosses were chosen to identify the French and English troops in the "Kings' Crusade" of Philip II of France and Henry II of England, respectively. Together with the Jerusalem Cross, the plain "George's Cross" became a recognizable symbol of the crusader from about 1190, and in the 13th century it came to be used as a standard or emblem by numerous leaders or polities who wanted to associate themselves with the crusades.[clarification needed] The red-on-white combination was chosen by Genoa and Aragon, among others. Saint George was depicted as a crusader knight during this time, but the red cross had no particular association with him. A crusader-era fresco in the crypt of Trani cathedral shows Saint George wearing a white cross on a red surcoat. The white-on-red version was chosen as the Reichsbanner ("imperial banner") by the German crusaders in the 12th century, and Emperor Frederick II used it in his European campaigns of the 1250s after he had returned from the crusades. It continued to be used as the Reichssturmfahne ("imperial war flag") of the Holy Roman Empire, eventually giving rise to the flag of Savoy and the present-day flags of Switzerland and Denmark).


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_George's_Cross


Wapék (White) - Denotes the purity of Creation
Mekwék Klujjewey (Red Cross) - Represents mankind and infinity (four directions)
Nákúset (Sun) - Forces of the day
Tepkunaset (Moon) - Forces of the night

http://www.benoitfirstnation.ca/mikmaq_ ... olism.html

The Mi'kmaq were there when Leif came and when the Basque came and when the legend of Henry Sinclair came Bristol Fisherman and then the explorers
design originates as a Christian cross, and as such ultimately derives from 13th-century designs in use during the Crusades
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordic_Cross_flag

Looks like a Georges Cross
Saint George became widely venerated as a "warrior saint" during the Third Crusade.

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PostPosted: 19 Dec 2015 12:02 pm 
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Barbarian Storm wrote:

Of course ancient civilizations existed in America, like the women and children that got slaughtered at Wounded Knee (never forget them). They had great great great grandfathers and -mothers that walked the american soil 2000 years ago. Why arent you interested in their history at all? Why do you have to bring in Europeans and invent a history that is not there?
One period of my life I lived in the midwest and I know how little you care for real history and for your "indians". In school I had classes in government, in world history, in "american"(yeah, right) history - but no one taught me about the tribes of the great plains. Why?
The Vikings in Vinland was only around briefly and left no major mark in american history whatsoever.
Unless you know of evidence that I dont know?


Not sure which school you went to, but I learned about the Native Americans. "The Trail of Tears" among other sad stories like your "Wounded Knee". I have been to the "Little Bighorn Battlefield" twice now and have learned the history there from both sides, and there are two sides btw. I had a very good friend who was born and lived on the Rosebud for the early part of his life. he had some great stories about life there and he never showed any animosity toward me or any other whites. The old west, Cowboys and Indians and such was just that, old. Several of the worst episodes in North American history were the treatments of these Indians by Europeans during the years of first contact.
As for the Vikings, perhaps not, but 18 Templar ships did leave the Port of La Rochelle in 1307, do you happen to know where they went?

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PostPosted: 19 Dec 2015 4:50 pm 
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Hey Bill
have you looked at Andrew Heim's work
I'm fascinated because he sees the connection to the New Orleans Cathedral and the Acadians

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PostPosted: 19 Dec 2015 6:56 pm 
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Hey luvuian, isn't the history of the Mi'kmaq interesting enough without having to bring in Europeans?

And by the way, I was born on a small island in the middle of the Baltic ocean.
The island is a part of another country, but we have our own government and in most cases we rule ourselves.
We even have our own flag.

Image

A red cross.
But do I claim that is because we had contact with the templars? No I don't.

wayward wrote:
Not sure which school you went to, but I learned about the Native Americans. "The Trail of Tears" among other sad stories like your "Wounded Knee". I have been to the "Little Bighorn Battlefield" twice now and have learned the history there from both sides, and there are two sides btw. I had a very good friend who was born and lived on the Rosebud for the early part of his life. he had some great stories about life there and he never showed any animosity toward me or any other whites. The old west, Cowboys and Indians and such was just that, old. Several of the worst episodes in North American history were the treatments of these Indians by Europeans during the years of first contact.
As for the Vikings, perhaps not, but 18 Templar ships did leave the Port of La Rochelle in 1307, do you happen to know where they went?


I spent a year in Iowa in the midwest, in a small town where the native americans lived as outcasts in the outskirt of town, many of them unemployed and in social misery with abuse and alcoholism. I am quite confident that we learn more about their proud history in the schools of Scandinavia than you do in the USA. But perhaps the history of the indians was not just included in the education of the senior year of high school that I attended.

Ah, La Rochelle...
I was lucky enough to spend some time there (and in Carnac too) this summer on the way to Languedoc.
It is a very romantic city. I explored the restaurants in the harbour, enjoying oysters and mussels for dinner. That is the real treasure of La Rochelle.
But I agree, it's easy to sit there by the water during the setting sun and imagine a fleet of templar ships sail away towards the unkown.

However, IF any templar ships did leave, and IF they were loaded with valuables, isn't it more likely they sailed in familiar waters? I find it very hard to think they would try to cross the deep and wild Atlantic with a supposed treasure.

Sunset at La Rochelle:
Image

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PostPosted: 20 Dec 2015 1:00 am 
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Barbarian Storm wrote:

wayward wrote:
Not sure which school you went to, but I learned about the Native Americans. "The Trail of Tears" among other sad stories like your "Wounded Knee". I have been to the "Little Bighorn Battlefield" twice now and have learned the history there from both sides, and there are two sides btw. I had a very good friend who was born and lived on the Rosebud for the early part of his life. he had some great stories about life there and he never showed any animosity toward me or any other whites. The old west, Cowboys and Indians and such was just that, old. Several of the worst episodes in North American history were the treatments of these Indians by Europeans during the years of first contact.
As for the Vikings, perhaps not, but 18 Templar ships did leave the Port of La Rochelle in 1307, do you happen to know where they went?


I spent a year in Iowa in the midwest, in a small town where the native americans lived as outcasts in the outskirt of town, many of them unemployed and in social misery with abuse and alcoholism. I am quite confident that we learn more about their proud history in the schools of Scandinavia than you do in the USA. But perhaps the history of the indians was not just included in the education of the senior year of high school that I attended.


Ah, La Rochelle...

However, IF any templar ships did leave, and IF they were loaded with valuables, isn't it more likely they sailed in familiar waters? I find it very hard to think they would try to cross the deep and wild Atlantic with a supposed treasure.



Whats interesting to me is that many Europeans complain about the treatment of the American Indians (certainly not good), but don't mention such things as the massacre of the Cathars or the extermination of the Jews.

If Templar ships sailed familiar waters than you must know where they went, right?

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PostPosted: 20 Dec 2015 4:05 am 
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Quote:
Hey luvuian, isn't the history of the Mi'kmaq interesting enough without having to bring in Europeans?


Many Acadian families are results of Mi'kmaq and European intermarriages.......Their linked by blood


https://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/timeline/166.html

AD 1000: Viking ships land in Mi’kmaq homelands

Viking ships visit the homelands of the Mi’kmaq people in areas now known as Maine, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. The Norsemen trade a little with the Inuit and perhaps with the Mi’kmaq; the Inuit probably obtain yarn from the Vikings. At home, the Vikings describe grapevines and fascinate their friends with tales that are reported by a Muslim geographer in AD 1150.

“[In North America] there are animals of such enormous size that inhabitants of the inner islands use their bones and vertebrae in place of wood in constructing houses. They also use them for making clubs, darts, lances, knives, seats, ladders, and in general, all things which elsewhere are made from wood...” —Al-Idrisi, author of Nuzhet al-Mushtaq, AD 1150, a compendium of travelers’ stories from around the world


lets go back to 650 AD
At Cahokia, from 20,000 to 30,000 people of the Mississippian mound-building culture live in a 5-square-mile area east of what is now called St. Louis, Missouri. Like other mound builders, Cahokians clear fields and plant family farms within the city to supply its urban dwellers with corn, squash, and sunflowers.

The population of 20,000 to 30,000 at Cahokia (AD 650–1400) equals that of the ancient Mesopotamian city-states of Ur or Babel. Cahokia’s neighborhoods include houses, large plazas, public buildings, and more than 100 monumental earthen mounds. Suburban towns radiate outward from the city 50 miles in every direction.

Mound Building is seen in Ancient Ireland
like Newgrange ......just similarities are interesting

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PostPosted: 20 Dec 2015 4:41 pm 
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wayward wrote:
Whats interesting to me is that many Europeans complain about the treatment of the American Indians (certainly not good), but don't mention such things as the massacre of the Cathars or the extermination of the Jews.

If Templar ships sailed familiar waters than you must know where they went, right?


I hope we never forget the horrors of the past.

Where did the templars go? (If they really went anywhere at all?)
I have no idea - but a good guess would be that they went to an enemy of the king of France? Not too far away, if the fleet was indeed loaded with treasure.

Did the order know things would quickly became as difficult as it did? Did they have any idea? Did they really look for hiding place in an more or less unknown continent hundreds of years prior to Columbus, or were they simply looking for a temporary safehouse while they were expecting things to calm down in France and their name restored?

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PostPosted: 20 Dec 2015 5:08 pm 
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BS
Quote:
And by the way, I was born on a small island in the middle of the Baltic ocean.
The island is a part of another country, but we have our own government and in most cases we rule ourselves.
We even have our own flag.


A red cross.
But do I claim that is because we had contact with the templars? No I don't.


But you did read what I wrote about the red cross has a connection with the Templars and Crusaders
It's a fact....Saint George

The episode Saint George and the Dragon appended to the hagiography of Saint George was Eastern in origin,[1][2] brought back with the Crusaders and retold with the courtly appurtenances belonging to the genre of Romance. The earliest known depictions of the motif are from tenth- or eleventh-century Cappadocia[3] and eleventh-century Georgia;[4] previously, in the iconography of Eastern Orthodoxy, George had been depicted as a soldier since at least the seventh century. The earliest known surviving narrative of the dragon episode is an eleventh-century Georgian text.[5]

The dragon motif was first combined with the already standardised Passio Georgii in Vincent of Beauvais' encyclopedic Speculum Historiale, and then Jacobus de Voragine's Golden Legend (ca 1260) guaranteed its popularity in the later Middle Ages as a literary and pictorial subject.[6] The legend gradually became part of the Christian traditions relating to Saint George and was used in many festivals thereafter.[7]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Geo ... the_Dragon

He's the dragon slayer just like Saint Michael the Serpent Slayer

Saint George fortified himself with the Sign of the Cross
"Fifteen thousand men baptized, without women and children." On the site where the dragon died, the king built a church to the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint George, and from its altar a spring arose whose waters cured all diseas


The red cross was used by the Templars and Crusaders....and the Mi'kmaq and your country too .....their linked because the red cross means a hell of a lot

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PostPosted: 20 Dec 2015 11:04 pm 
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lovuian wrote:
The red cross was used by the Templars and Crusaders....and the Mi'kmaq and your country too .....their linked because the red cross means a hell of a lot


In this case, I doubt it.

The first flag of Swedish speaking Åland was a triband one of blue-yellow-blue and created by the owner of the local bookstore in Mariehamn, in honor of the great music festival of the city in 1922. However, it was forbidden by the Finnish authorities as was all the islanders attempts to move back into the sphere of old Sweden.

A new law of self-government for the islands was approved in 1952 which gave Åland it's right to keep a flag of it's own. This started a debate among the islanders which splits the archipelago into two camps. One part wanted the triband flag of 1922, and one part demanded a more traditional Scandinavian design - the cross flag. But the cross supporters were divided among themselves and produced suggestion after suggestion. But finally, in 1953, they managed to unite under a new suggestion: One that reminded a lot of the flag of Sweden, the old country from which Åland was separated as a result of the war of 1808-1809 against the Russian empire. The suggestion was a blue flag with a smaller red cross within a larger yellow cross.

In december 1953 the flag debate was over with the cross supporters being victorious.

I am not really sure how to fit templars and crusaders into this 8)
Anyway, if you read this far, thanks. I am sure was it was a bit boring :lol:

So no templars. We did however have a lot of vikings. Åland was a natural stop on the way to the great rivers of Russia, for the Vikings from Roslagen, the "Rus" (origin a bit disputed though), that came to found the kingdom of Kiev.

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PostPosted: 20 Dec 2015 11:47 pm 
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Barbarian Storm wrote:
lovuian wrote:
The red cross was used by the Templars and Crusaders....and the Mi'kmaq and your country too .....their linked because the red cross means a hell of a lot


In this case, I doubt it.

The first flag of Swedish speaking Åland was a triband one of blue-yellow-blue and created by the owner of the local bookstore in Mariehamn, in honor of the great music festival of the city in 1922. However, it was forbidden by the Finnish authorities as was all the islanders attempts to move back into the sphere of old Sweden.

A new law of self-government for the islands was approved in 1952 which gave Åland it's right to keep a flag of it's own. This started a debate among the islanders which splits the archipelago into two camps. One part wanted the triband flag of 1922, and one part demanded a more traditional Scandinavian design - the cross flag. But the cross supporters were divided among themselves and produced suggestion after suggestion. But finally, in 1953, they managed to unite under a new suggestion: One that reminded a lot of the flag of Sweden, the old country from which Åland was separated as a result of the war of 1808-1809 against the Russian empire. The suggestion was a blue flag with a smaller red cross within a larger yellow cross.

In december 1953 the flag debate was over with the cross supporters being victorious.

I am not really sure how to fit templars and crusaders into this 8)
Anyway, if you read this far, thanks. I am sure was it was a bit boring :lol:

So no templars. We did however have a lot of vikings. Åland was a natural stop on the way to the great rivers of Russia, for the Vikings from Roslagen, the "Rus" (origin a bit disputed though), that came to found the kingdom of Kiev.


No I read it all
and it was interesting
Let me explain how there is a connection
It's the cross and it means "Christianity" but more

Let's take the Swedish flag of Blue and a Gold cross
The flag of Sweden is a Scandinavian cross that extends to the edges of the flag. This Scandinavian cross represents Christianity.[2][3] The design and colors of the Swedish flag are believed to have been inspired by the present Coat of arms of Sweden of 1442, which is blue divided quarterly by a cross pattée of gold, and modeled on the Danish flag.[4] Blue and yellow have been used as Swedish colors at least since King Magnus III's royal coat of arms of 1275.

King Magnus III
was King of Sweden from 1275 until his death in 1290.
He's on the Skara Cathedral
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skara_Cathedral

Stone relief from the 12th century

According to legend, the 12th-century King Eric IX saw a golden cross in the sky as he landed in Finland during the First Swedish Crusade in 1157. Seeing this as a sign from God he adopted the golden cross against a blue background as his banner, though the golden cross was changed later to a yellow cross due to practicality. The problem with the mythology is partly the fact that there are no contemporary sources about the crusade and partly because there are no pictures or descriptions of the flag until the middle of the 16th century.

As later kings from the House of Eric were consistently buried at Varnhem Abbey near Skara in Västergötland

According to legends, Eric did much to consolidate Christianity in his realm and spread the faith into Finland. In an effort to conquer and convert the Finns, he allegedly led the First Swedish Crusade against the Finns and persuaded an English Bishop Henry of Uppsala to remain in Finland to evangelize the Finns, later becoming a martyr there by being killed as punishment for robbery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_IX_of_Sweden
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_IX_o ... EricIX.JPG

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PostPosted: 21 Dec 2015 12:41 am 
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lovuian wrote:
Barbarian Storm wrote:
lovuian wrote:
The red cross was used by the Templars and Crusaders....and the Mi'kmaq and your country too .....their linked because the red cross means a hell of a lot


In this case, I doubt it.

The first flag of Swedish speaking Åland was a triband one of blue-yellow-blue and created by the owner of the local bookstore in Mariehamn, in honor of the great music festival of the city in 1922. However, it was forbidden by the Finnish authorities as was all the islanders attempts to move back into the sphere of old Sweden.

A new law of self-government for the islands was approved in 1952 which gave Åland it's right to keep a flag of it's own. This started a debate among the islanders which splits the archipelago into two camps. One part wanted the triband flag of 1922, and one part demanded a more traditional Scandinavian design - the cross flag. But the cross supporters were divided among themselves and produced suggestion after suggestion. But finally, in 1953, they managed to unite under a new suggestion: One that reminded a lot of the flag of Sweden, the old country from which Åland was separated as a result of the war of 1808-1809 against the Russian empire. The suggestion was a blue flag with a smaller red cross within a larger yellow cross.

In december 1953 the flag debate was over with the cross supporters being victorious.

I am not really sure how to fit templars and crusaders into this 8)
Anyway, if you read this far, thanks. I am sure was it was a bit boring :lol:

So no templars. We did however have a lot of vikings. Åland was a natural stop on the way to the great rivers of Russia, for the Vikings from Roslagen, the "Rus" (origin a bit disputed though), that came to found the kingdom of Kiev.


No I read it all
and it was interesting
Let me explain how there is a connection
It's the cross and it means "Christianity" but more

Let's take the Swedish flag of Blue and a Gold cross
The flag of Sweden is a Scandinavian cross that extends to the edges of the flag. This Scandinavian cross represents Christianity.[2][3] The design and colors of the Swedish flag are believed to have been inspired by the present Coat of arms of Sweden of 1442, which is blue divided quarterly by a cross pattée of gold, and modeled on the Danish flag.[4] Blue and yellow have been used as Swedish colors at least since King Magnus III's royal coat of arms of 1275.

King Magnus III
was King of Sweden from 1275 until his death in 1290.
He's on the Skara Cathedral
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skara_Cathedral

Stone relief from the 12th century

According to legend, the 12th-century King Eric IX saw a golden cross in the sky as he landed in Finland during the First Swedish Crusade in 1157. Seeing this as a sign from God he adopted the golden cross against a blue background as his banner, though the golden cross was changed later to a yellow cross due to practicality. The problem with the mythology is partly the fact that there are no contemporary sources about the crusade and partly because there are no pictures or descriptions of the flag until the middle of the 16th century.

As later kings from the House of Eric were consistently buried at Varnhem Abbey near Skara in Västergötland

According to legends, Eric did much to consolidate Christianity in his realm and spread the faith into Finland. In an effort to conquer and convert the Finns, he allegedly led the First Swedish Crusade against the Finns and persuaded an English Bishop Henry of Uppsala to remain in Finland to evangelize the Finns, later becoming a martyr there by being killed as punishment for robbery.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_IX_of_Sweden
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_IX_o ... EricIX.JPG


You have some excellent points there.
However, the red color I think is more or less coincidence.

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PostPosted: 21 Dec 2015 1:25 am 
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The meaning of the red cross
red passion cross being reserved for use on the white Templar mantles, most of the time on the left breast.

The Mi'kmaq flag resembles a battle flag of the Templars

It's a coincidence but then you have legends and myths talking about knights from Europe fleeing oppression from the Vatican and France's king

The Mi'kmaq fought against the British and were allies with the French during the war

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PostPosted: 21 Dec 2015 11:31 am 
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lovuian wrote:
The meaning of the red cross
red passion cross being reserved for use on the white Templar mantles, most of the time on the left breast.

The Mi'kmaq flag resembles a battle flag of the Templars

It's a coincidence but then you have legends and myths talking about knights from Europe fleeing oppression from the Vatican and France's king

The Mi'kmaq fought against the British and were allies with the French during the war


But in that case, they should have fought against the French?

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PostPosted: 21 Dec 2015 4:28 pm 
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Barbarian Storm wrote:
lovuian wrote:
The meaning of the red cross
red passion cross being reserved for use on the white Templar mantles, most of the time on the left breast.

The Mi'kmaq flag resembles a battle flag of the Templars

It's a coincidence but then you have legends and myths talking about knights from Europe fleeing oppression from the Vatican and France's king

The Mi'kmaq fought against the British and were allies with the French during the war


But in that case, they should have fought against the French?


It's about Protestant and Catholic......the Vatican and England and France and Spain and they wanted the land and income

The King of England was head of the Church too....they wanted an oath taken

I don't think they had a choice really ....just gathered up and many died ...the myths and legends traveled with them

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PostPosted: 21 Dec 2015 4:47 pm 
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http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/fl- ... ml?ref=yfp

In the heart of the Treasure Coast, a team of archeologists is poring over a 14,000-year-old site that could completely rewrite the prehistory of the state and, to some extent, the prehistory of humankind in the New World.

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PostPosted: 02 Apr 2016 1:01 am 
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Queen Bee
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Joined: 13 Jan 2009 3:29 am
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Location: Texas
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The ancient chronicles told of a larger-than-life Viking warrior with a shock of red hair, banished from his home for killing another man, who sailed with hundreds of followers to an icy island in the sea. And they told of his son, who set out only a few years later to an even more distant place he knew as “Vinland,” but which today’s historians believe were the eastern coasts of modern day Canada and the United States.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/mor ... h-america/

Excavations at the Newfoundland settlement uncovered seeds of the butternut tree, which doesn’t naturally grow north of New Brunswick, suggesting that inhabitants traveled south to obtain them. Meanwhile, the sagas tell of exploration in a body of water much like the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, Parcak said; the site at Point Rosee would be an ideal waystation for such a journey.

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