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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 5:24 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Oops. Mistook a path marker for a mountain.


Last edited by TCJ on 24 Apr 2017 2:41 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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 Post subject: Glencoe
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 5:33 pm 
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Queen Bee
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Joined: 22 Mar 2007 1:57 pm
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Location: France
Wonderful TCJ ...that does the heart good.
It's been 25 years since I've been home.


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 5:41 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
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The accuracy of your ancestors leaves me beyond astounded.


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 Post subject: Yes..
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 5:48 pm 
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Queen Bee
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Location: France
I love your comment.
Your ancestors too if I'm not mistaken.

The accuracy of the European Celts in laying out their roads is what helped the Romans get around so quickly. The infrastructure was already in place when Iulius Caesar finally hauled his arse over the Latin border.


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 6:57 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Hillock of Breakna.
Quote:
In 1797 descibed as a circular tower of about 180' circumference. The author of the P.S.A.S. chapter made it about 170' in circumference, with walls 12' thick and an int. diameter of roughly 30'. http://www.themodernantiquarian.com/sit ... eakna.html

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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 10:22 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Sheila wrote:
Old sacred places are built over the intersection of these 'dragon lines' for a specific reason.

The north-south line begins on fabled but now sunken Seven Stones (50° 1'11.85"N 6° 9'4.72"W), crosses pin-pointedly with ancient sites on Gigha, Jura and elsewhere, and ends at Laide (57°52'31.13"N 5°32'25.36"W).
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Quote:
Evidence is much stronger, however, for the fabled lost land of Lyonesse, no doubt the best known of our legendary sunken kingdoms. Its capital, the City of Lions, is said to have existed in the area of the Seven Stones, which lie seven miles west of Land’s End. To allow the whole of the legendary land of Lyonesse to be above sea level would require a drop of 60ft in ocean depth. The last time that this was the case was toward the end of the last Ice Age, some 9,000-10,000 years ago, perhaps stretching back into prehistory. https://thejournalofantiquities.com/cat ... lly-isles/


Last edited by TCJ on 24 Apr 2017 5:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 10:57 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Jura's Cul A' Bhaile hut circle has the same door situation.
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Quote:
The finds included: stone hammers; a range of flint tools, flakes and cores; worked stones; and a small amount of pottery probably representing two vessels.
Four radiocarbon dates were obtained from charcoal associated with the house: 1265bc +- 80, 980bc +-65, from between the Period 1 and 2 forecourt surfaces; 940bc+-, from the filling of the Period 1 external drainage ditch; 795bc+-70, from core material of the Period 2 wall.

https://canmore.org.uk/site/38277/jura-cul-a-bhaile


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 3:24 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Correction: The 23.4 line doesn't cross nearby Sgor na h-Ulaidh as I posted earlier from misunderstanding a path marker.
Instead, it crosses Glencoe's Signal Rock (56°39'51.60"N 5° 4'4.23"W) with a boggling precision.

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Quote:
The rocks original title is “Tom a Ghrianain” meaning the knoll of the sun, and it is said that Druids used this rock because it’s a great location to view the rising of the sun and the sun setting and used for worshiping the sun. It is also claimed that this was a meeting place of the MacDonalds to reach in case of an emergency, or the site where a beacon would be lit by the clan to warn of any dangers and this could be another link to the Glencoe Massacre. http://www.scotlandinfo.eu/where-is-sig ... k-glencoe/

Quote:
Nowhere in the contempory account written after the Massacre of Glencoe does it say that the signal for the Massacre was given from the Rock. We are told that the soldiers were given instructions to rise at 5am as surprise would then be on their side. The story that a signal was given by lighting a fire on the Signal Rock was only started in about the 1970's but seems to have got to peoples imagination inspite of all the efforts of local people here in Glencoe to quash that incorrect story. http://www.electricscotland.com/history ... l_rock.htm


Quote:
The first historical figure connected with Glencoe was Fingal, one of the greatest Celtic heroes and leader of the Feinn, warriors of Gaelic mythology. The glen was his legendary home and his memory is preserved in a number of place names, for example Sgor nam Fiannaidh (rock of the Feinn). http://www.glencoescotland.com/about-glencoe/history/


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 4:33 pm 
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Queen Bee
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Location: France
Have you read Graham Robb ?


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 4:43 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Soon after, a dark area (burned?) on the apex of Sgor nam Fiannaidh is passed within a few yards (56°40'57.31"N 5° 3'10.94"W).
The summit with perhaps a very weathered stone circle.
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Loch Ness' Fort Augustus (57° 8'41.66"N 4°40'39.52"W) is a possibility.

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Quote:
The Gaelic name for the modern village is Cille Chuimein and until the early 18th century the settlement was called Kiliwhimin. It was renamed 'Fort Augustus' after the Jacobite Rising of 1715. The accepted etymology is that the settlement was originally named after Saint Cummein of Iona who built a church there. Other suggestions are that it was originally called Ku Chuimein after one of two abbots of Iona of the Comyn clan, whose badge Lus mhic Chuimein refers to the cumin plant, or that it was called Cill a' Chuimein ("Comyn's Burialplace") after the last Comyn in Lochaber. http://panoramaof.com/gb/2236994-Fort-Augustus/


Last edited by TCJ on 25 Apr 2017 12:53 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 4:46 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Sheila wrote:
Have you read Graham Robb ?

No, but recall wanting to get his The Discovery of Middle Earth.


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 Post subject: Mediolanum
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 5:17 pm 
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Queen Bee
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Location: France
I've got "The Ancient Paths- Discovering the lost map of Celtic Europe".
I recommend it, even though he waffles, once you get half way through you've got the gist.

Quote - "The Romans did a good job of writing their predecessors out of history...."

Basically it is a wonderful reworking of history and confirms what I was taught as a youngster.
If you can't find it, I'll send you my copy.


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 5:36 pm 
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High King

Joined: 22 Sep 2008 3:15 pm
Posts: 2026
Much appreciated. As I insisted in another section here, one could strike long lines from anywhere to anywhere in GB and hit on numerous standing stones, circles, tombs, holy wells etc. and I left out here many of those that were close but not close enough, but, this 23.4 one appears as hard to discard as like the St Michael and St Mary Alignments and with the same intentions.


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:18 pm 
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High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
Have you read Graham Robb ?


Glad someone else like his book 'discovery of middle earth;.
When i mentioned i was reading it a while back and recommended it i seem to repair
most were not interested!

The book is easily available on amazon.


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:29 pm 
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Queen Bee
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Joined: 22 Mar 2007 1:57 pm
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Location: France
I remember you did Sandy...so he must have two books ?


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:31 pm 
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High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
He has published lots of books.
Sorry for my typos in first post ... i was typing int he dark.
It should have read 'i seem to remember ...'

I believe its just a rehashed new title for same book ...

Anyway - i loved the book. Wish i could write so evocatively ....


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:35 pm 
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High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
This is the next one for me to read:

Ancestral Journeys: The Peopling of Europe from the First Venturers to the Vikings

"Ideas about European ancestors are being transformed through archaeology, linguistics and the new genetic revolution. 'Ancestral Journeys' skilfully weaves these multiple strands to produce a startling new history of Europe. It will be of compelling interest to those who want to trace their ancestry through DNA and understand what the results mean. The fast-paced narrative is illustrated with specially commissioned maps and diagrams, as well as photographs and drawings, showing the movements of people, the spread of languages and DNA distributions. Unprecedented in the scope of its research, this paradigm-shifting, highly readable book challenges our established ways of looking at Europe's past and its people. The discovery of ancient DNA provides evidence that the European gene pool was stirred many times. Clues are also enhancing our understanding of European mobility, including the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons, the spread of the Slavs and the adventures of the Vikings."

Cant wait :mrgreen:


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 12:55 am 
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Grand Master

Joined: 10 Jan 2010 10:10 pm
Posts: 1547
Location: pennsylvania
Sheila wrote:
I remember you did Sandy...so he must have two books ?


I read The discovery of middle earth, and I have,but have yet to read The discovery of France.


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 Post subject: Re: Stuff...
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 10:56 am 
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High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
What were your thoughts CG?


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