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 Post subject: Circuit - The Magician.
PostPosted: 18 Nov 2016 8:30 pm 
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High King

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The Dagobert verses were written in 1790 lampooning Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette and later verses were added lampooning Napoleon III. Also, the Magician is Number One of the tarot the verse is probably number Seven depending on the Larousse version.


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PostPosted: 18 Nov 2016 9:37 pm 
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And?


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PostPosted: 19 Nov 2016 1:46 pm 
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There is an underlying Circuit based on the order of the Dagobert verses as set out in the Grand Larousse.


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PostPosted: 21 Nov 2016 2:41 am 
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Maybe this will help others understand what you're talking about, Pilrig.

Quote:
Le bon roi Dagobert
A mis sa culotte à l'envers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi!
Votre Majesté
Est mal culottée.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Je vais la remettre à l'endroit.

Comme il la remettait
Un peu il se découvrait ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Vous avez la peau
Plus noire qu'un corbeau.
Bah, bah, lui dit le roi,
La reine l'a bien plus noire que moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Fut mettre son bel habit vert ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre habit paré
Au coude est percé.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Le tien est bon, prête-le moi.

Du bon roi Dagobert
Les bas étaient rongés des vers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Vos deux bas cadets
Font voir vos mollets.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Les tiens sont neufs, donne-les moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Faisait peu sa barbe en hiver ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Il faut du savon
Pour votre menton.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
As-tu deux sous ? Prête-les moi.

Du bon roi Dagobert
La perruque était de travers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Que le perruquier
Vous a mal coiffé !
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Je prends ta tignasse pour moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Portait manteau court en hiver ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Est bien écourtée.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Fais-le rallonger de deux doigts.

Du bon roi Dagobert
Du chapeau coiffait comme un cerf ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
La corne au milieu
Vous siérait bien mieux.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
J'avais pris modèle sur toi.

Le roi faisait des vers
Mais il les faisait de travers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Laissez aux oisons
Faire des chansons.
Eh bien, lui dit le roi,
C'est toi qui les feras pour moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Chassait dans la plaine d'Anvers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Est bien essouflée.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Un lapin courait après moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Allait à la chasse au pivert ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
La chasse aux coucous
Vaudrait mieux pour vous.
Eh bien, lui dit le roi,
Je vais tirer, prends garde à toi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Avait un grand sabre de fer ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Pourrait se blesser.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Qu'on me donne un sabre de bois.

Les chiens de Dagobert
Étaient de gale tout couverts ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Pour les nettoyer
Faudrait les noyer.
Eh bien, lui dit le roi,
Va-t-en les noyer avec toi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Se battait à tort, à travers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Se fera tuer.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Mets-toi bien vite devant moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Voulait conquérir l'univers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Voyager si loin
Donne du tintoin.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Il vaudrait mieux rester chez soi.

Le roi faisait la guerre
Mais il la faisait en hiver ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Se fera geler.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Je m'en vais retourner chez moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Voulait s'embarquer pour la mer ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Se fera noyer.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
On pourra crier : « Le Roi boit ! ».

Le bon roi Dagobert
Avait un vieux fauteuil de fer ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre vieux fauteuil
M'a donné dans l'œil.
Eh bien, lui dit le roi,
Fais-le vite emporter chez toi.

La reine Dagobert
Choyait un galant assez vert ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Vous êtes cornu,
J'en suis convaincu.
C'est bon, lui dit le roi,
Mon père l'était avant moi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Mangeait en glouton du dessert ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Vous êtes gourmand,
Ne mangez pas tant.
Bah, bah, lui dit le roi,
Je ne le suis pas tant que toi.

Le bon roi Dagobert
Ayant bu, allait de travers ;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Votre Majesté
Va tout de côté.
Eh bien, lui dit le roi,
Quand tu es gris, marches-tu droit ?

A Saint Eloi, dit-on
Dagobert offrit un dindon.
"Un dindon à moi!
lui dit Saint Eloi,
Votre Majesté
a trop de bonté."
"Prends donc, lui dit le roi,
C'est pour te souvenir de moi."

Le bon roi Dagobert
Craignait d'aller en enfer ;
Le grand saint Eloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Je crois bien, ma foi
Que vous irez tout droit.
C'est vrai, lui dit le roi,
Ne veux-tu pas prier pour moi ?

Quand Dagobert mourut,
Le diable aussitôt accourut;
Le grand saint Éloi
Lui dit : Ô mon roi !
Satan va passer,
Faut vous confesser.
Hélas, lui dit le roi,


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_bon_roi_Dagobert_(song)

And here:

https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_Bon_Roi_Dagobert


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PostPosted: 21 Nov 2016 9:35 am 
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Wombat,

its not that i dont understand what he is talking about - its more about the point he is trying to make?


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PostPosted: 21 Nov 2016 11:59 am 
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bergeredearcadie wrote:
Wombat,

its not that i dont understand what he is talking about - its more about the point he is trying to make?

Yes, I understand.

My comment was a general one - not pointed at you. So please accept my apologies if that is how it came across.

This thread has had 82 views since it began. Others are reading and may not have had the benefit of the background material - given that so much of it is in French.

It would be very helpful if Pilrig was not quite so cryptic. Even a reference or two might help the rest of us (or me at least) better follow where he wants to go. For example, would he like to give a link - or a reference - to the 'Grand Larousse" to which he refers? Common hymn-sheets have a lot going for them.


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PostPosted: 21 Nov 2016 6:47 pm 
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http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k1 ... /f11.image


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PostPosted: 21 Nov 2016 10:25 pm 
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Wombat wrote:
bergeredearcadie wrote:
It would be very helpful if Pilrig was not quite so cryptic.


Would help if everybody wasn't so cryptic...lol. People love to play it close to the vest here, and I don't know what they're talking about a good 75% of the time. I don't ask, because I don't assume it's that simple - "Gosh, could everybody just explain themselves to me? Thanx!" Like when somebody asked Roscoe to precis his theory.

I get it, I just need to study up. Of course that's what I've been trying to do here, but extracting info from these threads is tough going. Don't worry, I don't expect anybody to pity me either...lol.

I understand that (in this case) there's supposed to be a way to rearrange the verses of this poem such that they somehow shed light on Cherisey's Circuit, revealing the "Circuit beneath Circuit." Or something. Has anybody ever made any convincing progress in doing this? Not that I've seen.

I think I'm back to the working assumption that Cherisey was a brilliant practical joker who worked the R-le-C/R-les-B (etc) subject matter into a pataphysical masterwork - which would be reason enough to get into it and try to disentangle a lot of the associations etc for the pure intellectual pleasure of it - but not having French in the first place, this already heavily mystified subject matter is even harder to sort out. I should probably learn French for the intellectual pleasure of it first ;)


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PostPosted: 21 Nov 2016 10:29 pm 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EN3MEkxm7MU


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PostPosted: 22 Nov 2016 9:58 pm 
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Wombat wrote:
bergeredearcadie wrote:
Wombat,

its not that i dont understand what he is talking about - its more about the point he is trying to make?

Yes, I understand.

My comment was a general one - not pointed at you. So please accept my apologies if that is how it came across.

This thread has had 82 views since it began. Others are reading and may not have had the benefit of the background material - given that so much of it is in French.

It would be very helpful if Pilrig was not quite so cryptic. Even a reference or two might help the rest of us (or me at least) better follow where he wants to go. For example, would he like to give a link - or a reference - to the 'Grand Larousse" to which he refers? Common hymn-sheets have a lot going for them.


The Grand Larousse was the leading work of reference in France, up there with the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Larousse publishes all kinds of dictionaries and works of reference that nobody attempting to translate Circuit should be without.


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PostPosted: 24 Nov 2016 9:27 pm 
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The opening lines of the Magician text have M Matras telephoning Valérien Ariès and there is a lot information packed into a few words.
Some people have suggested that M. Matras is supposed to represent Gérard de Sède but there is no hard evidence for this.
His name is interesting as at means a long necked vessel used in chemistry.
Stephen Anderson in the Rennes Observer no 53 points out that the name Poulepiquet is the name of a minor French noble family. Its coat of arms features chickens as does that of the Hautpoul family. He alludes to a boundary stone marked with chickens that was mentioned by Boudet.
Also he mentions the word poulepique means “like an octopus” and an octopus is supposed to have appeared on the Marie de Blanchefort tombstone as well as at the bottom of the Dossiers Secrets page on the Hieron du Val d’ Or.
Valérien Ariès is widely assumed to be Pierre Plantard and the PS the Priory of Sion. Someone also used that pseudonym on his website.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2016 4:39 am 
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Pilrig wrote:
The Dagobert verses were written in 1790 lampooning Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette and later verses were added lampooning Napoleon III. Also, the Magician is Number One of the tarot the verse is probably number Seven depending on the Larousse version.

and:

Pilrig wrote:

The Grand Larousse was the leading work of reference in France, up there with the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Larousse publishes all kinds of dictionaries and works of reference that nobody attempting to translate Circuit should be without.

Note this: "Larousse publishes all kinds of dictionaries and works of reference".

Exactly. Is the reference bergeredearcadie gave the one that carries the full set of the Dagobert verses? It's the Dictionary, AFAIK.

So, can you give the reference to the Larousse that carries the verses Pilrig? It needs to be specific; just "Grand Larousse" is not enough.


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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2016 7:38 pm 
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Le Grand Larousse Universel du 19ieme siècle

Happy to help !


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2016 3:39 pm 
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There is a line in a Wikipedia entry on Circuit that states that Charlot is an imaginary figure. What follows makes nonsense of that remark.
Amédée is Philippe de Chérisey’s stage name. He is keen to point out here and elsewhere that he was the same height as General De Gaulle, the President of France (1958-1969) at the time Circuit was written. In actual fact de Gaulle was slightly taller.
There has been some speculation that Philippe de Chérisey was a Gaullist but the image he gives here of the President sitting on his backside trying to decipher satirical speech bubbles is hardly flattering.
Philippe de Chérisey also mentions Eugene Ionesco and Roland Dubillard as among his acquaintances
Apparently Philippe de Chérisey was keen to claim acquaintance with Ionesco but after a drunken episode which might well be the one he recounts here, Ionesco got fed up with him and could possibly have written the play “Amédée, ou comment s’en Débarasser” as a result.
There is no doubt that de Chérisey knew Rolland Dubillard as he was his partner in the duo Grégoire et Amédée which was a nightly feature on French radio from 1953 to 1964. The series of comedy sketches was assembled by Dubillard with the title “Diablogues” and is still performed in theatres today.
In view of these and the following autobiographical details the main protagonist of Circuit is none other than Philippe de Chérisey himself whatever the name he chose to go under under.


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2016 7:27 pm 
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Pilrig wrote:
There is a line in a Wikipedia entry on Circuit that states that Charlot is an imaginary figure. What follows makes nonsense of that remark.
Amédée is Philippe de Chérisey’s stage name. He is keen to point out here and elsewhere that he was the same height as General De Gaulle, the President of France (1958-1969) at the time Circuit was written. In actual fact de Gaulle was slightly taller.
There has been some speculation that Philippe de Chérisey was a Gaullist but the image he gives here of the President sitting on his backside trying to decipher satirical speech bubbles is hardly flattering.
Philippe de Chérisey also mentions Eugene Ionesco and Roland Dubillard as among his acquaintances
Apparently Philippe de Chérisey was keen to claim acquaintance with Ionesco but after a drunken episode which might well be the one he recounts here, Ionesco got fed up with him and could possibly have written the play “Amédée, ou comment s’en Débarasser” as a result.
There is no doubt that de Chérisey knew Rolland Dubillard as he was his partner in the duo Grégoire et Amédée which was a nightly feature on French radio from 1953 to 1964. The series of comedy sketches was assembled by Dubillard with the title “Diablogues” and is still performed in theatres today.
In view of these and the following autobiographical details the main protagonist of Circuit is none other than Philippe de Chérisey himself whatever the name he chose to go under under.


Interesting post. Of course some of Ionescu's characters have interesting names - Amédée, Madeleine, Bérenger....

Ionescu was a follow of 'pataphysics and Jarry and from that golden age of the Oulipo!


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2016 8:12 pm 
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An interesting selection of names on the part of Ionesco indeed.

Philippe de Cherisey's choices of names are very interesting too.

Incidently, Eugène Ionesco was indeed the first recipient of the Alphonse Allais trophy in 1954. It is not impossible that Philippe de Chérisey could have presented the trophy as he worked in that part of France for a time as a producer. Alphonse Allais was born in Honfleur in 1854 and was a poet and humourist. He was famous for puns and putting together two sentences which sound the same but are spelt differently and have a different meaning. We see de Chérisey using both of these devices in Circuit. Allais also founded the club for Hydropaths – those allergic to water - which would probably have appealed to de Chérisey and Ionesco!


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2016 10:01 pm 
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Philippe de Chérisey seems to be convinced that Ionesco’s play is about him even though Ionesco’s motive for writing it seems to be less than flattering.

After the outline of the play's plot an extra line appears in the version on Rhedesium which I understand was provided by Louis Vazart.

M MATRAS Geneven in in a rustic thatched hut in the Spanish countryside.”

Further on there is a reference to how de Chérisey and Dubillard met in the death Club in at the Maison de Deletère or Toxic House which does not appear in the Paris version.


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PostPosted: 01 Dec 2016 10:15 pm 
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Philippe de Chérisey goes on to provide more autobiographical details. As Amédée he was part of a double act on radio with Roland Dubillard, called “Grégoire et Amédée” that ran from1953 until the French Broadcasting authority became the ORTF in 1964 when it seems that there was no place for their type of humour in the organisation. Then he goes on to introduce the Golden Triangle which is the title a novel by Maurice Leblanc, creator of the famous gentleman thief and detective Arsène Lupin. Jean-Luc Chaumeil wrote a book about the Rennes-le-Château mystery called Le Trésor du Triangle d’Or. At the same time the idea of the 0 meridian is introduced


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PostPosted: 06 Dec 2016 8:23 pm 
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Philippe de Chérisey elaborates on the theme of meridians by explaining that Valérian Ariès has ordered that Amédee should undergo a test administered by Matras on the subject of meridians one of which is marked by the Paris Observatory.
Amédee then gives the example of the Colmar meridian.


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PostPosted: 09 Dec 2016 9:48 pm 
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After Amédée digresses into the Colmar meridian, Matras praises him for the allusion to Unterlinden but concentrates his attention on Paris.
Amédée replies by mentioning a serious accident in the vicinity of Rodez but quickly switches to Paris and in particular the Odeon Theatre where he may or may not have worked. A procession of individuals pass by including one who runs his cane along a set of railings. Could this be an allusion to a scene in a Charlie Chaplin film as the description fits? Then we have a M’dame Augustin Nouveau who has proved difficult to find. However there was a symbolist poet called Germain Nouveau who was brought up by relatives after the death of his parents and who had mental health problems. Then it is back to Rodez with the mention of the Wild Child of Aveyron who is linked to the Abbé Résina which can be pronounced La Bérezina which means a catastrophe or disaster. Could this be another allusion to the fatal accident which took place in the vicinity of Rodez? Then we have a reference to the Lancelot a gang of counterfeiters. Both Lancelot and counterfeiters appear later in Circuit.
The Odeon Theatre is close to some places which feature in Rennes mythology like St Geramin des Prés and St Sulpice as well as the Paris Meridan and the so called Rose Line.


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PostPosted: 16 Dec 2016 10:42 am 
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The Carpeaux Fountain is some distance away from the Odeon Theatre. It is on the line of the Paris Meridian as it extends from the Paris Observatory to the Palais de Luxembourg. Four female figures forming the four points of the compass hold a celestial sphere above their heads so its relevance to Circuit is pretty obvious.
Can’t find any reference anywhere to a man without shoes running backwards but the Closerie des Lilas was frequented by Alfred Jarry the creator of pataphysics and also the Goncourt Brothers.


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PostPosted: 16 Dec 2016 1:36 pm 
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Pilrig wrote:
Can’t find any reference anywhere to a man without shoes running backwards but the Closerie des Lilas was frequented by Alfred Jarry the creator of pataphysics and also the Goncourt Brothers.

See Note 7 here:

viewtopic.php?p=144396#p144396

and Notes 8, 9 and 10 for the context.

At the Closerie des Lilas reference you might also meet some even more relevant names. Try Man Ray for example. That will ring a bell in a later chapter. Chapter III and the singing of Roseline's favourite song: "The History of O".


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PostPosted: 19 Dec 2016 8:45 pm 
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I don’t see how the documents in the psycho test are in any way connected with the famous or infamous parchments. The only thing that they have in common are that they are described as photocopies. One is supposed to be an extract from a letter to Christopher Columbus, another from Christopher Columbus’s journal a journal, another form a history text book another from a tourist brochure and another from a poster. Besides there are six of them not two or perhaps four as in the case of the parchments.
The extracts have been discussed extensively on the Circuit Translation Thread and also on a Christopher Columbus thread.
Amédée’s response is a bit strange seeing as his task was to sum up each of the extracts in one sentence but instead he sums up the whole lot and in the tome limit of one minute too.


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PostPosted: 30 Dec 2016 7:00 am 
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Pilrig wrote:
The Carpeaux Fountain is some distance away from the Odeon Theatre. It is on the line of the Paris Meridian as it extends from the Paris Observatory to the Palais de Luxembourg. Four female figures forming the four points of the compass hold a celestial sphere above their heads so its relevance to Circuit is pretty obvious.
Can’t find any reference anywhere to a man without shoes running backwards but the Closerie des Lilas was frequented by Alfred Jarry the creator of pataphysics and also the Goncourt Brothers.


Minus 2 feet backwards.

*
Image

and...

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/c ... tid=399644
The British Museum;-

Museum number

1772,0312.56

Description

Full: Front

Bronze folding foot-rule, measuring one Roman foot.
Image

_________________
************


Last edited by rain on 05 Jan 2017 5:26 am, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: 03 Jan 2017 2:51 am 
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Amédée, or How to Get Rid of It (French: Amédée ou comment s'en débarrasser) is a play written by Eugène Ionesco in 1954 based on his earlier short story entitled "Oriflamme".


Quote:
Plot[edit]
The play is about Amédée, a playwright, and his wife Madeleine, a switchboard operator. They discuss how to deal with a continually growing corpse in the other room. The corpse is causing mushrooms to sprout all over the apartment and is apparently arousing suspicion among the neighbors. The audience is given no clear reason why the corpse is there. Madeleine suggests he was the lover Amédée murdered; Amédée gives several alternate explanations. At the end of the play Amédée attempts to drag the corpse away to dump it in the river. He is seen by many passers-by; one of the witnesses is referred to as "Eugene" and is likely the author himself. When Amédée becomes tangled in the legs, the corpse floats away with Amédée attached.

Analysis[edit]
The play contains many of Ionesco's common themes, and the characters are typical of his plays. For example, the couple's interaction is similar in many ways to the interaction between the Old Man and the Old Woman in The Chairs; the conflicting background story of the corpse parallels the old couple's conflicting stories about their children. Amédée is also in many ways the prototype of Bérenger, one of Ionesco's most commonly used characters; specifically, many of the actions and themes presage A Stroll in the Air (1963), Ionesco's fourth Bérenger play: both Amédée and Bérenger are frustrated artists, both take a moment to appreciate the beauty around them, and both fly away leaving their spouses behind.




Underneath the streets of Paris grow the champignon de paris.




Quote:
The Mushroom of Paris
A little history...
Mushrooms of layer, of strain? The explanation is quite simple but involves a different cleaning

Mushrooms of Paris 2
Did you know why the mushrooms of Paris are the only ones that you have to peel? One must go back a century back and understand the expression "mushrooms". They grow in quarries and use manure from horses as fertilizer.

The "Champignon de Paris" is a misnomer, it comes from Anjou, specifically the city of Saumur. The origin of the mushroom of Paris goes back to Louis XIV, he would therefore be born in Versailles thanks to La Quintinie gardener of the king.

Later, at the time of Napoleon III, these same mushrooms will be cultivated in the catacombs and other Parisian quarries. At the moment when the construction of the Parisian metro began, which had become undesirable, they emigrated to Anjou, where they now prospered on the banks of the Loire, in numerous quarries carved out of a white stone called "tuffeau" .In these galleries, the temperature is fresh All year round (about 15 ° c) and constant humidity. Saumur famous for its "Cadre Noir" Cavalry School provides the horse dung needed to make the compost used for the cultivation of these mushrooms.

France produces 200,000 tons of mushrooms from Paris, of which 45,000 tons are destined for the "fresh" market, 70% of which comes from the Saumur region. The main producers of mushrooms in the world are: the United States, China and the Netherlands.

The "Paris mushroom" is the family of "agaricaceae" like "Agaricus" Bisporus species. The variety "wild" or natural of this fungus is the "Rosé des Pres" or "Agaricus campestris," probably the best of agarics, it grows in large groups in near the end of the summer after the rain never In the forest, it is also recognized by its strong fungal odor.

The cultivated agarics were selected from generation to generation to obtain two different varieties. The "White" which tolerates career in air currents and "blond" tastier, who prefer more sheltered galleries capital. The variety of "blond" tends to be scarce.

The Agarics and in particular the mushrooms of Paris are mushrooms whose free slices are pink when the fungus is young, then brown-black to black as it ages. The spores are brownish, the hat generally fleshy smooth and white, the foot is initially attached to the hat by a veil that quickly turns into a ring, it does not carry volve, which allows when wild mushrooms are concerned To distinguish them from white and deadly amanites.

Tasty diversification vegetable, the fungus of diapers is available all year round. It is easy to integrate into a simple, light, low energy cooking (15kcal / 100gr). It also has a remarkable richness in minerals, trace elements and vitamins (group B and rarer vitamins D and K). Its fibers help the intestines function properly. It is perfect for diets without salt, it gives perfume and flavor to the menus hyposodés and embellishes the menus without disobeying the constraints of the diet.

The mushroom of Paris, if it does not have the nobility of its confreres near and wood, makes it possible to embellish all year round the bourgeois and rustic dishes of traditional cuisine: veal blanquette, sole or escalope normandy, Omelette forest, daubes, mushrooms in the Greek, salad with vinaigrette with lemon juice. But it also accompanies a more sophisticated kitchen in the form of soups, velvety, sauces, stuffed vegetables etc. And it is not neglected by the greatest chiefs.

Do you not deprive the "Paris mushrooms" healthy, available, inexpensive, easy to cook, you wait all year to beautify your life.


http://www.messynessychic.com/2014/02/2 ... catacombs/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mines_of_Paris

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