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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 5:48 am 
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High King

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End of?

Nope.

Start of.

Sheila says:

Quote:
dos d’âne ( do-dan) is a humpack in the road...

But wait.

Look:

Image

Now why would he use d'ane?

Sheila says it's because "he uses Anne wherever he can". And un dos d’âne sounds like Anne.

I'm sceptical. Did he put a footnote in the original? Did somebody ask him why he described the humpback as a donkey back?

And how does anybody know that the 2cv actually hit a humpback? Was there an accident report that described the road condition and layout that caused the death? If so where is it? Let's see how we get to humpback from the report.

Sheila also called it a switchback.

Quote:
2. There was no donkey, it was a switch back in the road that broke her back.

They are very different:

Switchback A set of sharp bends

Humpback A speed bump.

So which was it?

How do you know?

I'm not saying that Cherisey maintains that Roseline ran into an actual donkey (as in Hee Haw) but rather, Cherisey described the installation in, or beside, the road as a donkey back (un dos d’âne) for a reason other than the rhyme of its sound.

Has he used this technique before? Of course he has. All through Circuit.

And why b l e u é l e c t r i q u e?


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 5:54 am 
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Queen Bee
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dos d’âne is what they are called...it was a hump in the road.


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 5:58 am 
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The deudeuche hit a dôs d'âne.

Don't sweat the small stuff Wombat.


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 12:37 pm 
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Quote:
Don't sweat the small stuff Wombat.

No sweat Sheila. And thank you for your patience on this. I do appreciate it.

A humpback or dos d'ane. That's fine. But it's not the point.

The point is that while Cherisey wrote it was a dôs d'âne, was it really, or was he saying it was because of the convenience of its rhyming? Where is the evidence that the vehicle hit a speed hump after twice crossing the double lines?

On the other hand, even if it were a donkey back, did he find that fact useful as a play on words? The evidence seems to suggest that he did, as you say, because of its rhyme with Anne. But was that the end of it? Did he also use it because of its useful double meaning? He was an erudite man. He would have been well aware of the story of the donkey's back and the crucifixion.

And why "barbed" wire? Why not just good old French (or fence) wire? Why the adjective?

And why b l e u é l e c t r i q u e?


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 2:01 pm 
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Wombat wrote:
He would have been well aware of the story of the donkey's back and the crucifixion.

And why "barbed" wire?


Barbed wire looks similar to a certain style of "crown" worn by a certain crucified man, so we`ve been told.


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 5:43 pm 
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Last edited by Eginolf on 20 Jan 2017 9:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 5:47 pm 
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Last edited by Eginolf on 20 Jan 2017 9:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 6:50 pm 
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High King

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Wombat wrote:
Quote:
Don't sweat the small stuff Wombat.

No sweat Sheila. And thank you for your patience on this. I do appreciate it.

A humpback or dos d'ane. That's fine. But it's not the point.

The point is that while Cherisey wrote it was a dôs d'âne, was it really, or was he saying it was because of the convenience of its rhyming? Where is the evidence that the vehicle hit a speed hump after twice crossing the double lines?

On the other hand, even if it were a donkey back, did he find that fact useful as a play on words? The evidence seems to suggest that he did, as you say, because of its rhyme with Anne. But was that the end of it? Did he also use it because of its useful double meaning? He was an erudite man. He would have been well aware of the story of the donkey's back and the crucifixion.

And why "barbed" wire? Why not just good old French (or fence) wire? Why the adjective?

And why b l e u é l e c t r i q u e?


Chapter 7 of Circuit is very difficult and has prompted much head scratching in both French and English as to what Phillipe de Cherisey is on about. Shows the wisdom of taking things slowly and carefully working through the whole Circuit thing. Ironically what appears to be the most weird with de Cherisey is actually the most accurate and illuminating!

Don't forget that de Cherisey was a radio performer where they can let their imagination and those of the audience run riot. That is why in the radio version of the Hitch Hiker's guide to the galaxy Zaphod Beeblebrox could have two heads and three arms. When it was put on TV and also made into a film finding a two-headed, three-armed actor was a bit problematical.


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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 7:37 pm 
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Quote:
And why b l e u é l e c t r i q u e?
Sorry for the late response.
There are several levels of interpretation for this phrase (b l e u é l e c t r i q u e), but I'll insist here and now on the most superficial one (more connected to the context Cherisey is using it in):

-In Paris, the Metro line M1 (La Défense - Château de Vincennes) is yellow. " Vingt-deux, la ligne jaune" ...
- The Yellow Line M1 crosses the Blue Line M2 (Porte Dauphine - Nation) in two points: the Charles de Gaulle - Étoile station and the Nation Station ...
Quote:
Still, on two occasions, the car (4) crossed the yellow line which turned to the bleu électrique

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PostPosted: 14 Jan 2017 8:01 pm 
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franchir la ligne jaune

Aller trop loin ; franchir une limite qu'il ne fallait pas dépasser.

To "cross the yellow line" is to take things too far, to cross over a limit that shouldn't be crossed.

In this instance, it was crossed twice.


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 12:01 am 
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Thank you: Crimson Ghost, Eginolf, Pilrig, Boris and Sheila.

That has to be the best set of responses ever.

Boris, should we leave your thread and start another: the "Death of Roseline" so that your wonderful b l e u é l e c t r i q u e isn't further side-tracked?

Crimson Ghost:

Quote:
Barbed wire looks similar to a certain style of "crown" worn by a certain crucified man, so we`ve been told.

Told by whom? Do you have some references to this please? (other than my comment further up the thread).

Boris: Great.

Quote:
-In Paris, the Metro line M1 (La Défense - Château de Vincennes) is yellow. " Vingt-deux, la ligne jaune" ...
- The Yellow Line M1 crosses the Blue Line M2 (Porte Dauphine - Nation) in two points: the Charles de Gaulle - Étoile station and the Nation Station ...

Yes. That has to have some significance. Now, I wonder what it is? De Gaulle - The Nation. That makes sense, but why?

The line of 22 stations also mentioned by Dingron-Mozart in the Note to the Preface.


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 3:47 am 
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Wombat wrote:

Crimson Ghost:

Quote:
Barbed wire looks similar to a certain style of "crown" worn by a certain crucified man, so we`ve been told.

Told by whom? Do you have some references to this please? (other than my comment further up the thread).



The sarcasm is thick Wombat.


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 4:58 am 
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High King

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Crimson_Ghost wrote:
Wombat wrote:

Crimson Ghost:

Quote:
Barbed wire looks similar to a certain style of "crown" worn by a certain crucified man, so we`ve been told.

Told by whom? Do you have some references to this please? (other than my comment further up the thread).



The sarcasm is thick Wombat.

:P

Really? Barbed too, no doubt?

And there I was thinking I'd offered an original idea, in this enigma of regurgitation.

So why the barbed wire? Why wrapped around the wheel hub?

There are many things about Cherisey's account in "Circuit" of Roseline's death in the car accident that are problematic.

Oh, and BTW, don't forget her second coming in Chapter XIII Death.


Last edited by Wombat on 15 Jan 2017 6:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 6:07 am 
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High King

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Boris Balkan wrote:
Quote:
And why b l e u é l e c t r i q u e?
Sorry for the late response.
There are several levels of interpretation for this phrase (b l e u é l e c t r i q u e), but I'll insist here and now on the most superficial one (more connected to the context Cherisey is using it in):

-In Paris, the Metro line M1 (La Défense - Château de Vincennes) is yellow. " Vingt-deux, la ligne jaune" ...
- The Yellow Line M1 crosses the Blue Line M2 (Porte Dauphine - Nation) in two points: the Charles de Gaulle - Étoile station and the Nation Station ...

And, interestingly, the Roseline (Redline A) of the RER (Suburban express network) joins them both.

And the Roseline (from Saint-Sulpice) bisects both the Yellow Line (M1) and the Blue Line (M2) and passes through or near the Lady of the Roses cathedral in Rodez, the scene of Roseline's death.

Now, does this cross go "Ding dong"?

Image


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 1:37 pm 
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Ding dong? Could you be... more specific ?

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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 4:31 pm 
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Boris wrote " Ding dong? Could you be... more specific ? "


:lol:

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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 4:43 pm 
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Well... I know it sounds funny but didn't mean to. I really want to see where Wombat goes with this.

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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 5:25 pm 
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High King

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Wombat wrote:
Boris Balkan wrote:
Quote:
And why b l e u é l e c t r i q u e?
Sorry for the late response.
There are several levels of interpretation for this phrase (b l e u é l e c t r i q u e), but I'll insist here and now on the most superficial one (more connected to the context Cherisey is using it in):

-In Paris, the Metro line M1 (La Défense - Château de Vincennes) is yellow. " Vingt-deux, la ligne jaune" ...
- The Yellow Line M1 crosses the Blue Line M2 (Porte Dauphine - Nation) in two points: the Charles de Gaulle - Étoile station and the Nation Station ...

And, interestingly, the Roseline (Redline A) of the RER (Suburban express network) joins them both.

And the Roseline (from Saint-Sulpice) bisects both the Yellow Line (M1) and the Blue Line (M2) and passes through or near the Lady of the Roses cathedral in Rodez, the scene of Roseline's death.

Now, does this cross go "Ding dong"?

Image


Great post :P although that map reminds me of the day my husband and I got totally lost on the Paris underground, we spent hours going around in circles in the wrong direction twice :shock:


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 6:22 pm 
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My station was Miromesnil. Lived there for 2 years. Good memories....! Worked near Opéra.

Always hated the métro during summer time. Not so good memories on that!


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PostPosted: 15 Jan 2017 9:35 pm 
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High King

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Boris Balkan wrote:
Ding dong? Could you be... more specific ?

8)

No. Not a railway crossing but "Ding dong" as in: does it ring a bell.

For example:

Image

The colours are not as clear as they should be but nevertheless.

The cross.

22. Yellow. Blue.

Death.

Electric eh?

The woman of the Fisher of Men.

Fisherwoman. Ding dong goes the bell. Chapter XIII. Death.


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 Post subject: aequātiō diērum
PostPosted: 26 Jan 2017 8:45 am 
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Queen Bee
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Sheila wrote:
...s’étant pris le moyeu dans un fil de fer barbelé, décrit la courbe gracieuse que les géomètres ont nommé « ruban de Moebius », ayant pour effet de retourner l’engin sur lui-même comme un gant...


The 2cv having caught the hub of her axle in barbed wire, describes the graceful curve that geometrist have named "a Moebius strip", having the effect of turning the machine back on itself like a glove.





Apropos of this ruban de Moebius, which you might think is irrelevant to the story - this graceful curve that the 2CV described in the air after hitting the dos d'âne.

This shape describes the passage of time...in fact it describes the equation of time.

Image

Meet the Analemma /Analème it marks the passage of the sun in the sky over a period of 365 days.


The resulting curve resembles a long, slender figure-eight with one lobe much larger than the other, known as a lemniscate of Bernoulli.

That is why the position of the Number plate of the car is important. It describes a three quarter twist, there's a small loop & a large loop, as does the figure of 8 described by the Analemma (Wombat will understand this bit.)...and the reason why the meridian is crossed over once, twice.

At the moment of the crash there is a distortion of time. A whole year ??

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Analemma

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemniscate_of_Bernoulli


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 Post subject: Re: aequātiō diērum
PostPosted: 27 Jan 2017 8:46 am 
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Sheila wrote:
Sheila wrote:
...s’étant pris le moyeu dans un fil de fer barbelé, décrit la courbe gracieuse que les géomètres ont nommé « ruban de Moebius », ayant pour effet de retourner l’engin sur lui-même comme un gant...


The 2cv having caught the hub of her axle in barbed wire, describes the graceful curve that geometrist have named "a Moebius strip", having the effect of turning the machine back on itself like a glove.








The resulting curve resembles a long, slender figure-eight with one lobe much larger than the other, known as a lemniscate of Bernoulli.







https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lemniscate_of_Bernoulli


Image

Further properties of the Lemniscate of Bernoulli

Quote:
The inversion of hyperbola yields a lemniscate
The lemniscate is symmetric to the line connecting its foci F1 and F2 and as well to the perpendicular bisector of the line segment F1F2.
The lemniscate is symmetric to the midpoint of the line segment F1F2.

The area enclosed by the lemniscate is 2a2.
The lemniscate is the circle inversion of a hyperbola and vice versa.
The two tangents at the midpoint O are orthogonal and each of them forms an angle of {\displaystyle {\tfrac {\pi }{4}}} \tfrac{\pi}{4} with line connecting F1 and F2.


I'd check that - it looks as if both lobes should be equal.

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Last edited by rain on 27 Jan 2017 11:13 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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PostPosted: 27 Jan 2017 8:51 am 
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Queen Bee
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No rain, i do not need to check anything, thank you all the same.


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 Post subject: crossing the Meridien
PostPosted: 27 Jan 2017 5:13 pm 
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Queen Bee
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The equation of time is positive in the westward direction and negative to the east.

When the heroes of our story are west of the meridian time runs normally.
But when they are east of the meridian time runs backwards.



"Oh que je suis fatiguée"

Time is the key to Circuit.

Circuit is a story of two souls (and a car)


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PostPosted: 28 Jan 2017 9:26 pm 
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High King

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You say that the equation of time is positive to the west and negative to the east - what does that mean ? You say that when our heroes are to the west of the meridian time runs normally and when they are to the east it runs backwards. How do you work that out seeing as the action from chapter III to most of chapter XXI where a number of time shifts take place is set in the Canary Islands and a glance at an Atlas shows that they are to the west of both the Paris and the Greenwich meridians ?


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