Arcadia Discussion Zone

Forums dedicated to history's mysteries, Rennes-le-Château and beyond…

Read the Arcadia Forum House Rules

It is currently 25 Nov 2017 7:23 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 369 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
Author Message
PostPosted: 27 Apr 2017 8:07 pm 
Offline
Grand Master

Joined: 14 Dec 2010 1:48 am
Posts: 1841
bergeredearcadie wrote:
since there's a tirade heading this way,

From where?

I think you should all go over to my Forum :mrgreen:

I know its not as good as here but you know .... thats the way it goes .... :mrgreen:


It's working now? It's moron free?

_________________
Roma Victor!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Apr 2017 4:56 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
bergeredearcadie wrote:
Aprositus Nesos

Why have you brought this person into your rubbish?


You interviewed him on your website you halfwit!


http://www.rhedesium.com/interview-with-paul-karren.html

Another one you people drove away.

But again we have another case where you put two and two together and make six.

It's an island off El Hierro

Quote:
Situated somewhere west of Europe, St. Brendan’s Isle is a phantom island often regarded as myth, since, unless it is the so-called "Eighth Canary Island" known since time immemorial to the Spanish and Portuguese authorities as San Borondón, only a few have claimed to have seen it.

In the Irish tradition, the island is named after the Saint Brendan who founded the Clonfert monastery and monastic school. It was apparently discovered by the saint and his followers while they were traveling across the ocean, evangelizing to islands. It appeared on numerous maps in Christopher Columbus’s time, apparently acting as one of the things spurring him on to explore the ocean westwards.

It also sparked some controversy because the claim is that St. Brendan and his brethren arrived at the Americas in the 6th century (around 530 A.D.). The first mention of the island was in the ninth-century Latin text Navigatio Santi Brendani Abatis (Voyage of Saint Brendan the Abbot), placing the island into Irish and European folklore.

In 1976, explorer Tim Severin undertook St. Brendan’s voyage, using a leather currach, to see if the voyage was possible. They did manage to arrive at Newfoundland following the records of the Latin text, confirming that it was possible to have made the voyage described, but they didn’t find the mysterious isle.
Contents

* 1 Other evidence
o 1.1 Antiquity
o 1.2 Middle Ages
o 1.3 Early Modern Age
o 1.4 Modern Age

[edit] Other evidence

The evidence for San Borondón from Spanish and Portuguese sources is as follows.


In the second century, the astronomer, mathematician and geographer Ptolemy, speaking of the Canary Islands, described in his Geografia (Book IV-6-34) the same Isles of the Blessed of which one island, Aprositus Nesos "can never be reached or is not visible." Due to its characteristics and weird behaviour, in which it appears and disappears, or hides behind curtains of mist or low cloud, it has been called The Inaccessible or Insubstantial or other such names.

The existence of this rogue island has been observed, and sworn to, by thousands of people throughout history. Nowadays it is known generally as San Borondon, for St Brendan de Cluainfort (b. Tralee 484, d. Annaghdown 577), who claimed to have landed on it in 512 together with 14 monks, with whom he held a mass. The monastic party reported its stay as 15 days, while the ships expecting their return complained that they had been kept waiting a year, during which period the island remained concealed behind a thick curtain of mist.

In his Navigatio Sancti Brendan Abbatis, the monk Barino mentioned having visited this same "Paradise" in the Atlantic, a thickly wooded mountainous island where the sun never set and it was always day: the flora were abundant, the trees bore rich fruit, the rivers ran with fresh water, and the birds sang sweetly in the trees.

Christian authors such as the monk Gaunilo (Isla Perdida, 11th century) and the encyclopaedist Honorius Augustusdunensis were quite certain as to the existence of one or more mysterious Atlantic islands near the Canaries archipelago, some of which may be found marked on maps of the 11th century cartographer San Severo: other believers from the contemporary Muslim world were Al-Bekri and El Edvisi (1154).

In Planiferio de Ebstorf (1234), Marcos Martinez referred to "the lost island discovered by St Brendan but nobody has found it since" and in Mapamundi de Hereford (1275) the whole archipelago is described as "The Isles of the Blessed and the Island of St Brendan".
[edit] Early Modern Age

The greater precision of later accounts, particularly from the late 15th century onwards, bears testimony to the regularity with which the mysterious island was disposed to show itself to the Castilian and Portuguese settlers of El Hierro, La Palma and La Gomera. The quality of the witnesses, including bishops, priests, military commanders, mayors, doctors, fishermen and mariners, was such that the chronicler Clavijo deemed the phenomenon "not of the vulgar imagination."

The Portuguese writer Luís Perdigão recorded the interest of the King of Portugal after a sea captain informed Henry the Navigator (1394-1460) that he had found the island but was driven off by tumultuous sea conditions. Henry ordered him back: he sailed off but never returned.

In his shipboard diary for 9 August 1492, Christopher Columbus wrote that he "had the assurance of many respectable Castilian inhabitants of the island of El Hierro, who were at Gomera with Doña Inez Peraza, mother of Guillen Peraza, later first Count of Gomera, that every year they saw land to the west of Gomera, and others of Gomera affirmed the same on oath. The Admiral recalls that while in Portugal in 1484 there came a person to the King (João II) from the island of Madeira to beg for a caravel to go to this land that was seen, who swore that it could be seen every year, and always in the same way."

Particularly from the beginning of the 16th century, the reputation of the new island, and belief in its probable existence, increased. By the Peace of Elvira, signed on 4 June 1519, the Portuguese Crown conceded to the Crown of Castille all claims in the conquest of the Canary Islands, including La Isla Nom-Trubada o Encubierta—the Not-found or Hidden Island. (The complete record of Portuguese maritime exploration was lost when fire destroyed the Lisbon archive in the 1755 earthquake.)

During his trip around the world in 1520, Magellan mapped the large bay south of the Río de la Plata in Argentina and named it Samborombón Bay in the belief that it was the place where San Borondón's island had become detached from the American continent.

The year 1566 saw the most determined historical effort to locate and explore the island of San Borondón when Dr Hernán Pérez de Grado, First Regent of the Royal Canary Islands Court, ordered the justices at la Palma, El Hierro and La Gomera to investigate the phenomenon. The enquiry was headed by Fernando de Villalobos, military governor of La Palma. Included in the panel of researchers were Gaspar Pérez de Acosta, a coastal pilot with 34 years' experience, and Fray Lorenzo Pinedo, a Franciscan monk with an excellent knowledge of seafaring.

In his history, Abreu y Galindo reports a conversation with a French adventurer claiming to have visited San Borondon, departing hence when a storm set in and making the voyage to La Palma for shelter within a day. In another report, Alonso de Espinosa, governor of El Hierro, described sighting San Borondon island north west of El Hierro and "leeward" of La Palma. He listed 100 witnesses to the apparition. In the same year, 1570, Pedro Ortiz de Funez of the Inquisition obtained the statement of Marcos Verde, a person of renown in the Canaries, according to chronicler Clavijo. Verde swore on oath that after returning to the Canaries "from the Berber coast" he observed from a high point "an island to the west where none should be" and set out for it. Upon arrival, he anchored in a bay at the foot of steep cliffs and at nightfall went ashore with a party of men to explore. The group split up and took different paths, but all were driven back to the sea after hearing "terrified voices screaming for help". Once all had returned aboard ship, according to the chronicler Nuñez de la Peña, a hurricane set in, causing the vessel to drag anchor. They left the anchorage to obtain sea room, at which time the island disappeared.

Nuñez de la Peña also describes how a French ship, masts and rigging down, approached the island to obtain a lee during a severe storm. Once ashore a tree was felled and fashioned for repairs, the whole afternoon being taken up with this work: when night fell the storm had risen to such an extent that the crew embarked with haste and abandoned the island, arriving next day at La Palma.

Another deponent to the 1570 enquiry was Pedro Velho, a pilot of Setúbal in Portugal, who stated that due to severe weather he alighted on San Borondon with two men and there saw "marvellous sights": cows, sheep and goats at pasture, freshwater rivers, cliffs, mountains, beaches, thick forests, strange fruits and plants. He also reported seeing hieroglyphic inscriptions and traces of human presence. At dusk the sky clouded over and a hurricane set in, at which, fearing for his ship, Velho returned aboard hurriedly, deciding to get clear of shore immediately. As he sailed, he lost sight of the island, which had seemingly vanished, but he lingered for some considerable time in the area "in the forlorn hope of finding the two men he had left behind exploring the jungle."

The island is considered to be much larger than La Gomera, on the north-south axis, about forty miles in length and twenty-five broad. Its estimated position puts it over a trench 6000 metres deep. Its contours appear to be two large bare mountains at each end with a heavily forested central section of relatively low land. The most frequent apparitions of San Borondon are at dawn and sunset: witnesses have reported seeing the sun set behind the island. In the days of sail, many seafarers approaching the Canaries from the west noted in their logs having sighted La Palma from afar and having been surprised to come across a second La Palma the next day.

Fray Abreu y Galida reported in Historia de la Conquista de las siete Islas Canarias that "the island of St Brendan (San Borondon), which is the eighth and last, whose existence may be inferred from sightings of its apparitions, seems to be located at 20 degrees 30 minutes of latitude and eight leagues (40 kilometres) due west of Gomera." (The longitude given in the coordinates is based on the old measurement before the introduction of the Greenwich meridian).
[edit] Modern Age

In 1719, the Scottish monk Sigbert de Gembloux reported seeing the island, as did Don Matea Dacesta, mayor of Valverde, El Hierro in 1721. As a result of these sightings, that same year Muy y Aguerre, military governor of the Canary Islands, appointed a new commission of enquiry under Gaspar Dominguez, a sea captain; no fresh evidence was uncovered and subsequently interest waned. According to the Canary historian Ramirez, in 1723 a priest performed the rite of exorcism towards the island during one of its apparitions behind low cloud. This was witnessed by a large number of persons and sworn to on affidavit.

In his Noticias, Vol I, 1772, chronicler Viera y Clavijo wrote: "A few years ago while returning from the Americas, the captain of a ship of the Canary Fleet believed he saw La Palma appear and, having set his course for Tenerife based on his sighting, was astonished to find the real La Palma materialize in the distance next morning." Viera adds that a similar entry is made in the diaries of Colonel don Roberto de Rivas, who made the observation that his ship "having been close to the island of La Palma in the afternoon, and not arriving there until late the next day", the officer was forced to conclude that "the wind and current must have been extraordinarily unfavourable during the night."

In 1759 a Franciscan monk mentioned, but not identified by name, by Viera y Clavijo wrote to a friend: "I was most desirous to see the island of San Borondon and, finding myself in Alexero, La Palma, on 3 May at six of the morning, I saw, and can swear to it on oath, that while having in plain view at the same time the island of El Hierro, I saw another island of the same colour and appearance, and I made out through a telescope, much wooded terrain in its central area. Then I sent for the priest Antonio Jose Manrique, who had seen it twice previously, and upon arrival he saw only a portion of it, for when he was watching, a cloud obscured the mountain. It was subsequently visible for another 90 minutes. being seen by about forty spectators, but in the afternoon when we returned to the same point we could see nothing on account of the heavy rain."

Further expeditions were organised in the search for the island, but from the 19th century onwards, reported sightings of San Borondon became less frequent.

In 1958, D.M. Rodriguez Quintero of Los Llanos de Aridane, La Palma, allegedly obtained a photograph of the island.

In Ecuador, South America, there is a county named Samborondón. The real origin of the name is unknown, but most sources name San Borondon as the name-giver.
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Brendan%27s_Island"
Categories: Phantom islands | Islands in the North Atlantic | Pre-Columbian trans-oceanic contact
Hidden categories: Articles lacking sources from July 2008 | All articles lacking sources


Thank you for reminding me why I don't stay here.

You people drive genuine researchers away who expose your ignorance. I'm accumulating evidence.

And in your case the mere mention of Bill Wilkinson should suffice. An example of how easily you get duped.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Apr 2017 8:07 am 
Offline
High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
You interviewed him on your website you halfwit!

You're the effin' f*ckwit - i know who exactly this person is.

Dont drag them into your pathetic arguments when you dont know what ur talking about.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Apr 2017 8:09 am 
Offline
High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
Thank you for reminding me why I don't stay here.

See a psychiatrist.

You people drive genuine researchers away who expose your ignorance. I'm accumulating evidence.

Deluded.

And in your case the mere mention of Bill Wilkinson should suffice. An example of how easily you get duped.

You have been far more duped than i ever will be in the crap reading you do, and then rehashing it parrot fashion as 'the truth' & 'research'.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 28 Apr 2017 8:42 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
bergeredearcadie wrote:
Thank you for reminding me why I don't stay here.

See a psychiatrist.

You people drive genuine researchers away who expose your ignorance. I'm accumulating evidence.

Deluded.

And in your case the mere mention of Bill Wilkinson should suffice. An example of how easily you get duped.

You have been far more duped than i ever will be in the crap reading you do, and then rehashing it parrot fashion as 'the truth' & 'research'.


Shall I post the picture of you and Bill Wilkinson now?

I'll give you this to be going on with

Andrew Gough and the Hoax

Most of us knew instantly Wilkinson's revelations was a crock of Doo Doo (my postings on here testify to that) but not you it seems.

And she calls me delusional.

By the way I was introduced to the Rennes le Chateau Mystery by Lawrence Gardner in 1983. I was at a Brie in Honeydew, South Africa. Our host was John "Ben" Bennett, my boss at the SABC at the time another guest was Prince Michael of Albany. This was after the First edition of Holy Blood Holy Grail - I've forgotten more about this subject than you will ever know. I have been to Rennes le Chateau five times. Needless to say I have a cupboard full of notes, pictures etc and most of it never gets published. My daughter may well take up the baton.

So you didn't know that Aprositus Nesos was a mysterious island off El Hierro then. Where shall I send the donkey ears too?

Quote:
Aprositus Nesos wrote:
lovuian wrote:
if you pronounce yours :wink:



Ay-pro-SEE-tus NAY-sose (close enough)

To understand the moniker one must have a basic familiarity with Ptolemy's second most famous work after the Almaghest: Geografia.

Here is a useful description from Wiki:
In the second century, the astronomer, mathematician and geographer Ptolemy, speaking of the Canary Islands, described in his Geografia (Book IV-6-34) the same Isles of the Blest of which one island, Aprositus Nesos "can never be reached or is not visible." Due to its characteristics and weird behaviour, in which it appears and disappears, or hides behind curtains of mist or low cloud, it has been called The Inaccessible or Insubstantial or other such names.

I chose it because it seemed apt given my generally private nature.

Best,

Paul (aka Pete aka Aprositus Nesos)


bergeredearcadie wrote:
You're the effin' f*ckwit - i know who exactly this person is.

Dont drag them into your pathetic arguments when you dont know what ur talking about.


I ain't talkin' about the person

You supposedly interviewed the guy and he told you what Aprositus Nesos was and like most other stuff you come across it went Whoosh!!! right over your head.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Apr 2017 7:49 am 
Offline
High King
User avatar

Joined: 04 Dec 2008 7:15 pm
Posts: 2414
Location: Vienna, Austria
That book by Paul Karren never got published. Maybe he lost his red thread "armature 681" ... ?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Apr 2017 9:20 am 
Offline
High King

Joined: 07 Nov 2006 11:57 pm
Posts: 4635
That book by Paul Karren never got published

He is still working on it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Apr 2017 9:08 pm 
Offline
High King

Joined: 26 Oct 2006 9:11 pm
Posts: 3205
Location: Livingston, Scotland.
rain wrote:
Pilrig wrote:
Sheila wrote:
verte "pâte égyptienne"

Osiris the Egyptian god of the Underworld. ... Distinguished by his green face.
green - the color of rebirth.

essence de Bergamote

In the past, psoralen extracted from bergamot oil has been used in tanning accelerators and sunscreens. These substances were known to be photocarcinogenic since 1959, but they were only banned from sunscreens in 1995. These photocarcinogenic substances were banned years after they had caused many cases of malignant melanoma and deaths.



In the recipe book “A La Table de L’Abbé Saunière” by Josette Barthe the Abbé Saunière’s cure for baldness included oil of bergamot (Rennes Observer) It is possible he grew bergamot and produced the oil himself


Where does it say the recipe for baldness? Where does this come from?


Here is a short story about Bergamot I found while studying the historical precedence for the use of it, in the Chrism oil.
http://www.whitelotusaromatics.com/newsletters/bergamot
Quote:
Bergamot

Bergamot

In mid-day heat we take the precipitous road
to GŽmenos. Over a succulent valley
we pause in scents of pine and bergamot,
and all day the car brims with musk and honey
Below, the sound of water, a quick stream,
cedars of Lebanon, a Judas tree,
and, red-gold under cliffs, like an old moment
of faith in wilderness, a quiet abbey.
On the secret forest path, where water fans
its moonlight over limestone, two girls spread
a scarlet carpet on the rock. They scrub
under falling water, till the stream runs red.
Gillian Clarke-:Magdalene in Provence

... Here, in the bosom of the mountains, sheltered from the north and the east, where the western gales alone seemed to breathe, all the blooms of spring and the riches of autumn were united. Trees of myrtle bordered the road, which wound among groves of orange, lemon, and bergamot, whose delicious fragrance came to the sense mingled with the breath of roses and carnations that blossomed in their shade. The gently swelling hills that rose from the plain were covered with vines, and crowned with cypresses, olives and date trees; beyond, there appeared the sweep of lofty mountains whence the travellers had descended, and whence rose the little river Paglion, swollen by the snows that melt on their summits, and which, after meandering through the plain,washes the walls of Nice, where it falls into the Mediterranean. ..
Ann Ward Radcliffe: The Romance of the Forest

ETYMOLOGY of Bergamot French bergamote, from Italian bergamotta, from Turkish dialectal beg-armudu, bey's pear : beg, bey; see bey + armud, pear + -u, possessive suff.
ETYMOLOGY: Turkish, from Old Turkic beg, ruler, prince. Origin of the Tree- The origin of this tree is obscure both on a geographical and a botanical point of view. Among the various theories, one says that Christopher Colombus brought the plant back from the Antillas or the Canaries to Spain. It then reached Calabria from the town of Berga, near Barcelona, from where it took the name, bergamot. It seems that it was Mr. Valentino who bought the first bergamot tree from a Spanish moor in the XVth century and grafted it on to a lemon plant in Santa Caterina. Another theory by Mr. Chapot is that bergamot tree is an hybride and comes from a cross between bitter orange " bigarade " -C. aurantium LIN.- and the true Lime with small fruits - C. aurantifolia CHRISM. Several anatomical, pathological and historical datas support this opinion.



As I mentioned Saunière’s cure for baldness comes from the recipe book “A La Table de L’Abbé Saunière” by Josette Barthe.
Mix 60g of castor oil, 60g of quinquina aperitif wine containing quinine) grams of essence of bergamot (that the Abbé Saunière can provide on request).
Massage into the scalp morning and evening,
(Thanks to the Rennes Phoenix Society)
The Good Abbé also had a recipe for hair tonic for the non follicly challenged based on rum and white wine. Perhaps he made his money selling mail order cosmetics and this might account for his huge orders of booze? Apparently he learnt about the benefits of herbs while at Clat from a shepherd called Boudinat. He had remedies for minor ailments among his parishioners


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 29 Apr 2017 9:14 pm 
Offline
High King

Joined: 26 Oct 2006 9:11 pm
Posts: 3205
Location: Livingston, Scotland.
Wombat wrote:
Pilrig wrote:
An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.

That's a keeper Pilrig. 8)

I'm going to add it to Footnote 26 for Chapter XIII - if that's OK by you.

It would be good to get the specific citation (including page number) for either or both Vainacre or/and Rennes Observer though.


The information about the lime tree at Fort Mardyk comes from an article called “Circuit” or the Legend of the Paris zero meridian by P. Plan-tard (sic) in Le Cercle page 36.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 30 Apr 2017 2:27 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Pilrig wrote:


As I mentioned Saunière’s cure for baldness comes from the recipe book “A La Table de L’Abbé Saunière” by Josette Barthe.
Mix 60g of castor oil, 60g of quinquina aperitif wine containing quinine) grams of essence of bergamot (that the Abbé Saunière can provide on request).
Massage into the scalp morning and evening,
(Thanks to the Rennes Phoenix Society)
The Good Abbé also had a recipe for hair tonic for the non follicly challenged based on rum and white wine. Perhaps he made his money selling mail order cosmetics and this might account for his huge orders of booze? Apparently he learnt about the benefits of herbs while at Clat from a shepherd called Boudinat. He had remedies for minor ailments among his parishioners


Thanks Pilrig. It looks like they are selling the ritual of the Holy Oil rather then the holy oil itself. No wonder the Church would have been upset with him.

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 30 Apr 2017 2:29 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Pilrig wrote:
Wombat wrote:
Pilrig wrote:
An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.

That's a keeper Pilrig. 8)

I'm going to add it to Footnote 26 for Chapter XIII - if that's OK by you.

It would be good to get the specific citation (including page number) for either or both Vainacre or/and Rennes Observer though.


The information about the lime tree at Fort Mardyk comes from an article called “Circuit” or the Legend of the Paris zero meridian by P. Plan-tard (sic) in Le Cercle page 36.


Also thanks.

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 30 Apr 2017 2:56 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
Pilrig wrote:
Wombat wrote:
Pilrig wrote:
An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.

That's a keeper Pilrig. 8)

I'm going to add it to Footnote 26 for Chapter XIII - if that's OK by you.

It would be good to get the specific citation (including page number) for either or both Vainacre or/and Rennes Observer though.



The information about the lime tree at Fort Mardyk comes from an article called “Circuit” or the Legend of the Paris zero meridian by P. Plan-tard (sic) in Le Cercle page 36.


LA Méridienne verte

Quote:
In the Languedoc-Roussillon région LA Méridienne verte goes through:
The Aude département : Les Martys, Conques-sur-Orbiel, Miraval-Cabardès, La Tourette-Cabardès, Villanière, Villardonnel, Salsigne, Aragon, Villegailhenc, Pennautier, Carcassonne, Cavanac, Couffoulens, Leuc, Verzeille, Ladern-sur-Lauquet, Saint-Hilaire, Villebazy, Saint-Polycarpe, Belcastel-et-Buc, Terroles, Peyrolles, Serres, Rennes-les-Bains, Sougraigne, Bugarach, Saint-Louis-et-Parahou, Lapradelle-Puilaurens, Gincla, Montfort-sur-Boulzane.


careful observers will note that these are not in a straight line. If you find this strange then you are not aware of how maps are made.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 06 May 2017 3:45 pm 
Offline
High King

Joined: 26 Oct 2006 9:11 pm
Posts: 3205
Location: Livingston, Scotland.
In reply to Rain’s request for Pierre Plantard’s article. The item is very long and a poor photocopy with words chopped off at the margins. I will see what I can come up with.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 06 May 2017 3:47 pm 
Offline
High King

Joined: 26 Oct 2006 9:11 pm
Posts: 3205
Location: Livingston, Scotland.
La Méridienne verte it is the name given by the creator of the line of lime tress marking the path of the Paris meridian for the Millennium. It refers to the gnomon casting its shadow at midday on a sundial. Each lime tree represents a gnomon.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 08 May 2017 2:36 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Pilrig wrote:
In reply to Rain’s request for Pierre Plantard’s article. The item is very long and a poor photocopy with words chopped off at the margins. I will see what I can come up with.


Whatever you can come up with is fine, we'll deal with it. At least we'll give it a go.

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 14 May 2017 9:31 pm 
Offline
High King

Joined: 26 Oct 2006 9:11 pm
Posts: 3205
Location: Livingston, Scotland.
rain wrote:
Pilrig wrote:
In reply to Rain’s request for Pierre Plantard’s article. The item is very long and a poor photocopy with words chopped off at the margins. I will see what I can come up with.


Whatever you can come up with is fine, we'll deal with it. At least we'll give it a go.



I believe a download of le Cercle is available at :-
http://www.mediafire.com/?sjp5r8eu5mrn8i9


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 14 May 2017 10:12 pm 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Pilrig wrote:
rain wrote:
Pilrig wrote:
In reply to Rain’s request for Pierre Plantard’s article. The item is very long and a poor photocopy with words chopped off at the margins. I will see what I can come up with.


Whatever you can come up with is fine, we'll deal with it. At least we'll give it a go.



I believe a download of le Cercle is available at :-
http://www.mediafire.com/?sjp5r8eu5mrn8i9


Sorry, the file is either deleted or invalid.

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 15 May 2017 11:54 pm 
Offline
Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: 20 Dec 2010 10:35 pm
Posts: 1185
Location: Santa Cruz
I've emailed Johan Netchacovitch, who originally put up the pdf, to see if he can make it available again.

_________________
"The earlier culture will become a heap of rubble and finally a heap of ashes, but spirit will hover over the ashes."

Ludwig Wittgenstein


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 31 May 2017 8:05 pm 
Offline
High King

Joined: 26 Oct 2006 9:11 pm
Posts: 3205
Location: Livingston, Scotland.
There is an alarming article in “La Dépêche du Midi, 4 June 1978 by Pierre Pons summarised in Pierre Jarnac’s “ Les Archives de Rennes-le-Château (p. 61)
Recalling the chain of disasters that strikes those taking an interest, close or not, in the treasure of Rennes, the journalist talks about the investigations he made on the island of Lanzarote in the Canaries into the stay there during the Revolution by an exiled priest, Abbé Cauneille, the curé of Rennes-les-Bains, in 1780. Not without some surprise, therefore, “we learned that a Frenchman named Sauveur, an innkeeper at Playa Blanca, who had in his possession a manuscript concerning this mysterious affair, had been murdered. The document has disappeared and the crime made to look like suicide, we were told by witnesses.”
In October 2009 another murder took place in Playa Blanca of a possible relation of Sauveur.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 369 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group