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PostPosted: 23 Apr 2017 6:59 pm 
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High King
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Howdy. Always there. 8)

... on the eastern shore of Andy's Forum.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 5:42 am 
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Quote:
FORT MARDYCK

The zero meridian entered France via Till Eulenspiegel and was then moved in the year 1670 following the work of the geographer Piccard. Louis XIV was anxious to establish on this Flemish territory a French community which, thanks to Colbert, formed a little country within a country, a sort of seed-bed for seafaring folk.

The history of Fort Mardyck is full of proud traditions, dating back to Julius Caesar embarking for Britain and handing over his command to Sulpitius the Red, from which is perhaps derived the name Blooteland, "land of blood", by which the Flemish still call it.

Christianized in 646 by Saint Eligius, it prides itself on having the first steeple surmounted by a cross ever to be seen in the north of Europe. In 911 the Peace of Gisors led to the baptism here of Rollo the Norman and his subsequent marriage to the daughter of Charles the Simple. The zero meridian at that time ran through a primitive lighthouse, the church and the rue du Gibet [where the gallows were].

In 1168 Fort Mardyck was the first town to be declared a "ville franche" [a town chartered by the King], a privilege solemnly renewed in 1297 by Philip the Fair. When the Count of Flanders was proclaimed King of Castile and Aragon in 1504 the town returned to the Spanish crown until 1662 when it was returned to France even thought the reconquest was achieved with the help of Cromwell. Responsibility for it then passed to the Marquis de Monpesat, who held Dunkirk and whose orders were to detach Fort Mardyk from the territories of the châtelain of Bergues, which were under English rule.

The restoration of this region to French influence in 1670 was a great success. The fishermen of the region, having been granting the privilege of raising geese there, maintained close economic links with the interior, and we know that this example was followed by a community in Lower Canada which still exists (1).

It was in 1679 that Vauban replaced the old lighthouse with a more modern structure, the lamp of which was covered with a small lead dome surmounted by a golden fleur-de-lys, the compass-North of which can still be seen today. This building was demolished in 1718 under the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht.


Tilluel en Spiegel

Tilluel = Lime Tree

Spiegel = Mirror.

Linden (Lime Tree) in Mirror

This passage comes in Circuit headed XIII (13) and is accompanied by the Tarot death Card (LA MORT)

A DAGOBERT II ROI ET A SION EST CE TRESOR ET IL EST LA MORT

To King Dagobert II and to Sion is this treasure and it is THE DEATH (card)



Image



Quote:
Rider-Waite symbolism of the Death Card

* The king is trampled by a reaping skeleton horseman, as the Pictorial Key to the Tarot describes him, which appears to be a personification of death. The fall of the king may represent the importance and magnitude of the critical event of this card.
* The reaper carries a black banner emblazoned with the Mystic Rose, which according to Waite symbolises life or rebirth.
* As in other cards, the gray background may indicate uncertainty surrounding this event.
* The bishop may represent faith in the face of death, faith in the divine plan, and faith that "God works in mysterious ways".
* The maiden seeming distraught by the fall of the king represents the sorrow and great pain that often accompanies death.
* The child, seemingly entranced by the occurrence, may represent bewilderment or curiosity.
* In the darkness behind, according to Waite's PKT, lies the whole world of ascent in the spirit.
o Although some believe the New Jerusalem (SION) appears as a silhouette across the Sun, it does not appear clearly enough to be certain and may instead be the tops of The Moon's mountains.

The Grim Reaper as a personification of Death is a common motif in European iconography; here, he illustrates a poem on the danse macabre.

Interpretation

A. E. Waite was a key figure in the development of modern Tarot interpretations. However, not all interpretations follow his model.

Some frequent keywords used by tarot readers for the interpretation of Death are:

* Ending of a cycle ----- Loss ----- Conclusion ----- Sadness

* Transition into a new state ----- Psychological transformation

* Finishing up ----- Regeneration ----- Elimination of old patterns

* Being caught in the inescapable ----- Good-byes ----- Deep change

According to Eden Gray and other authors on the subject, it is unlikely that this card actually represents a physical death. Typically it implies an end, possibly of a relationship or interest, and therefore implies an increased sense of self-awareness — not to be confused with self-consciousness or any kind of self-diminishment.


A. E. Waite was a member of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn. He became the enemy of Aleister Crowley. Admirers of the works of Louis Claude de Saint-Martin formed groups of Friends of St. Martin, which later became known as Martinists. They were influential on the formation of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.

As well as the Death Card, Section 13 in the Circuit document contains the passage

When Dagobert died,
the devil immediately ran up;
The great saint Eloi
said to him: O my king!
Satan is going to pass,
Must confess.
"Alas," said the king, "
could you not pass before me?


Saint Eloi is Saint Eligius

Quote:
"No Christian on the feast of Saint John or the solemnity of any other saint performs solestitia [solstice rites?] or dancing or leaping or diabolical chants. No Christian should presume to invoke the name of a demon, not Neptune or Orcus or Diana or Minerva or Geniscus or believe in these inept beings in any way. No one should observe Jove's day in idleness without holy festivities not in May or any other time, not days of larvae or mice or any day but Sunday. No Christian should make or render any devotion to the gods of the trivium, where three roads meet, to the fanes or the rocks, or springs or groves or corners."

The Life of St. Eligius, (St Eloi) 588-660

St Eligius, spiritual advisor to the Merovingian king Dagobert I.


FORT MARDYCK

Image

Image
Marduk, sun god of Babylon, with his thunderbolts pursues Anzu after Anzu stole the Tablets of Destiny.
In the perfected system of astrology, the planet Jupiter was associated with Marduk by the Hammurabi period

Dunkerque (Fort Mardyck) - Barcelona (i.e. Paris Meridian) = 390yards short of 666 miles (measured). This is to the Dunkirk tower however if one were to extend this to waste ground destroyed in WWII then you would get exactly 666 miles.

From Skellig Michael (off the coast of Co Kerry in ireland) to the Bourges Cathedral which is on the Paris Meridian you will measure 666 miles.

Over the door of Bourges Cathedral you will find

Image

St Michael.
So from Skellig MICHAEL through St MICHAELS mount near Penzance through Mont St MICHEL in Brittany to the Bourges Cathedral - famous for Sulpinus of Bourges, you will measure 666 miles.

On the south window of Bourges Cathedral you will find the story of St Ursinus and St Stephen. St Ursinus (French St Ursin) was the first Bishop of Bourges.

Image

St Stephen feast day between 25th December and New Years Day

The story of St Ursinus comes from Gregory of Tours who also wrote about St Martin and the cloak story

from the Circuit passage 13

Quote:
LA CHAPELLE SAINT-URSIN
Here is the center of the French surface and the middle of the French section of the meridian 0.
This place was consecrated by the kings of the world who were "Bituriges" and received Vércingétorix as a warlord. The battle took place more to the east in Avaricum, where Bourges today is by mutation of the Bituriges into bourgeois. Saint-Ursin on the immense camp where 40,000 horsemen gathered and where the headquarters were established, but there is a tradition of a subterranean passage linking the Saint Ursin chapel to the house of Jacques Coeur in Bourges, passing by the Faubourg d ' Auron.

Gregory of Tours quotes Saint Ursin as the first bishop of Bourges preceding Saint Sulpice.

The central location of the Saint Ursin chapel allows the two hexagonal emblems of the fleur de lis and the seal of Solomon to be printed simultaneously. In fact, the Jewish community, which held the red jasper basin decorated with gadroons from the temple of Jerusalem, was actually settled there in the sixth century.


According to Julius Caesar, once a year the Druids assembled at a sacred place in the territory of the Carnutes, which he believed to be the centre of all Gaul, and all legal disputes were there submitted to the judgment of the Druids.

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CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Last edited by roscoe on 24 Apr 2017 7:28 am, edited 4 times in total.

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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 6:20 am 
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And speaking of Lime Trees

Jean d'Arc and the Lime Tree

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CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
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 Post subject: Meridian
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 9:53 am 
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Whoaa!!! it just hit me.

Cherisey's double entende again.

Quote:
The zero meridian entered France via Till Eulenspiegel and was then moved in the year 1670 following the work of the geographer Piccard.


So we know Till Eulenspiegel means Tilleul en Spiegel

i.e. Lime mirrored

Lime is an anagram of MILE (lime mirrored?) . Contrived in normal instances but not with our friend de Cherisey who is renown for this kind of thing.

and in 1670 what happened?

Quote:
In 1668 the English cleric and philosopher John Wilkins proposed in an essay a decimal-based unit of length, the universal measure or standard based on a pendulum with a one-second period. In 1670 Gabriel Mouton, Bishop of Lyon, also suggested a universal length standard with decimal multiples and divisions, to be based on a one-minute angle of the Earth's meridian arc or (as the Earth's circumference was not easy to measure) on a pendulum with a one-second period. In 1675, the Italian scientist Tito Livio Burattini, in his work Misura Universale, used the phrase metro cattolico ("universal measure"), derived from the Greek μέτρον καθολικόν (métron katholikón), to denote the standard unit of length derived from a pendulum. As a result of the French Revolution, the French Academy of Sciences charged a commission with determining a single scale for all measures. On 7 October 1790 that commission advised the adoption of a decimal system, and on 19 March 1791 advised the adoption of the term mètre ("measure"), a basic unit of length, which they defined as equal to one ten-millionth of the distance between the North Pole and the Equator,[12][13][14][15] In 1793, the French National Convention adopted the proposal; this use of metre in English began at least as early as 1797.


Quote:
A French astronomer, Abbé Jean Picard, measured the length of a degree of latitude and computed from it the size of the Earth during 1669–1670. In 1666, Louis XIV of France had authorized the building of an observatory in Paris to measure longitude. On Midsummer's Day 1667, members of the Academy of Sciences traced the future building's outline on a plot outside town near the Port Royal abbey, with Picard's meridian exactly bisecting the site north-south. French cartographers would use it as their prime meridian for more than 200 years.


But they dropped the MILE (LIME mirrored) and adopted the Metre around 1799 through the work of Piccard.

The Paris meridian is 666 MILES not Metres.

Anybody who has read THE HIRAM KEY will know the significance of timing the passage of the sun (stars) with a pendulum of certain length

The length of the pendulum string is Professor Thom's Megalithic Yard.

The English statute mile was established by a Weights and Measures Act of Parliament in 1593 during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.

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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 10:19 am 
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Sheila wrote:
Ah, that old impudent trickster figure, Till Eulenspiegel the farceur who took his picaresque career throughout Germany, the Low Countries and France. In the stories, he is presented as a trickster or fool who played practical jokes on his contemporaries, exposing vices at every turn, greed and folly, hypocrisy and foolishness.

In the end, Till Eulenspiegel's pranks are not so much about the exposure of human weaknesses and malice, as much as the animus he embodies — the implicit breaking up and sublimation of a given status of consciousness, by means of its negation. A common theme to these stories is that of turning the prevailing mental horizon upside down, and unseating it with a higher one.

Chérisey was extremely clever.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 10:33 am 
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Sheila wrote:
Sheila wrote:
Ah, that old impudent trickster figure, Till Eulenspiegel the farceur who took his picaresque career throughout Germany, the Low Countries and France. In the stories, he is presented as a trickster or fool who played practical jokes on his contemporaries, exposing vices at every turn, greed and folly, hypocrisy and foolishness.

In the end, Till Eulenspiegel's pranks are not so much about the exposure of human weaknesses and malice, as much as the animus he embodies — the implicit breaking up and sublimation of a given status of consciousness, by means of its negation. A common theme to these stories is that of turning the prevailing mental horizon upside down, and unseating it with a higher one.

Chérisey was extremely clever.


Yep! He certainly was.

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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 1:47 pm 
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This Arcadia Discussion Zone is truly an amazing site.

The knowledge contained here is immense.

This was Whoop, years ago

Quote:
The church later became known as the Church of the Holy Wisdom. Some indentations in the rock were known as the footprints of Jesus. Furthermore the church was octagonal in shape.

Imprints of Jesus in the rock. Hmmm.

Nobody seemed to follow him up. What a pity. Although his reference seems to be Josephus; and/or the Piacenza Pilgrim. Specific details of the reference would be nice - but unusual on this site, unfortunately. (Yes, I know - we're all guilty of that).

Quote:
The Lord mounted it when he was heard by Pilate, and his footprints are still on it. He had a well-shaped foot, small and delicate

Footprints in black plastic. Footprints in Roman roadways. Footprints in rocks. Footprints of Jesus.

And an octagonal church. And pavement stones (John19:13). Fancy! Anne crouching on the pavement in the washroom.

Wherever I look I see circuits.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 1:56 pm 
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Oh, and by the way roscoe, thanks.

Quote:
Lime is an anagram of MILE (lime mirrored?) . Contrived in normal instances but not with our friend de Cherisey

The mirror image is a lateral inversion.

You're on to it too.


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 Post subject: A lonely sole.
PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 6:12 pm 
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It's always difficult to figure out what you guys know or don't know...like the situation you had with David-Leroy for instance. I assumed everybody knew that Leroy meant the king...Leroy is a very common name in France.

I never spotted that Lime is an anagram of mile - that's excellent Roscoe.


So...things that are obvious to one are not instantly obvious to others.

Take the footprint.

There are quite a few....

We have footprints of Buddha carved in stone.


And Christ/God left a famous one just up the road from me at l'Abbaye Sainte-Croix de Poitiers........Sainte Radegonde's gaff.

Her monastic cell/oratoire called "la chapelle du Pas de Dieu" - the Chapel of God's Footprint, has the "footprint of Christ" in it.
....Christ left it behind in the stone after her vision when he told her "You are the pearl in my crown."

However, because everything since the year dot either got Romanised or churchified we need to peer behind the veil and go back further in time....viz Osiris.
The soles of his feet that had trodden the earth were removed in order that he might tread the Hall of Judgement with pure feet and that "his feet were bathed with milk that the pain thereof might be assuaged".


And the other side of the coin is when the Egyptian kings visited the shrine to Osiris...they were very careful NOT to leave footprints when they had a meeting with the Gods Osiris, Isis & Horus in their individual shrines.

The king was very careful to erase his footprints with a broom on the way out...



Charlot blew it though...he put his foot in it.

It's all about the immortality of the Soul.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 7:56 pm 
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There's two ancient carved footprints at Dunadd, but the public only sees a protective fiberglass replica over the original King-maker.

Image

Quote:
In a semi-pagan ceremony, akin to the mythical Arthur pulling the sword Excalibur from its sacred rock, would-be Scottish kings had to place one foot in the stone footprint to activate their kingship. This act symbolised the king's marriage to the land, energising the soil so that harvests would be plentiful and the people successful in war. Kings believed to have been inaugurated at Dunadd include Kenneth Mac Alpin, who in 843 united the kingdoms of Dal Riata and Pictland. http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/1276 ... a_replica/


It's Wiki, so.. I'd no idea there were many in Scotland and elsewhere.
Quote:
In Ayr, on the southern bank of the River Ayr is 'Wallace's Heel', a natural sandstone slab from which flows a small spring. Sir William Wallace is said to have left the imprint behind whilst rushing to escape English soldiers who were pursuing him. He later returned to the spring, and dug out a bigger hole to get fresh water for him and his soldiers.

Among cup and ring marks on a boulder at Carnasserie, two miles (3 km) from Kilmartin in Argyll, are carved a pair of feet.

At St. Mary's Church in Burwick, South Ronaldsay, Orkney, is the Ladykirk Stone on which St. Magnus is said to have sailed over the Pentland Firth. It has two clear footprints cut into it.

A pair of footprints is carved in a stone slab in a causeway at the Broch of Clickhimin (or Clickemin), Lerwick, in Shetland. This site was occupied from about 1000 BC to AD 500.

Two footprints are to be found at Dunadd (Dun Monaidh), ancient capital of the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata. The completed one faces north and is accompanied by an image of a boar, rock-basins possibly cut for ceremonial ablutions and an ogham inscription. This footprint is said to be that of Oisin or Fergus Mor Mac Erca, the first King of Dalriada, who died in AD 501. St. Columba is said to have installed Aidan as King on this rock.

The best preserved footprint is 27 cm long, nearly 11 cm wide, 9 cm across at the heel and 2.5 cm deep; so large that it would fit a foot clothed in a shoe or boot. A second, incomplete footprint is a lightly pecked outline of a shod right foot, 24 cm long and 10 cm in maximum width. It has a pronounced taper to the heel; further internal peck-marks suggest that it was to have been hollowed out. It is on the same alignment as the other footprint.

A crag near the chapel of Keil and St. Columba's Well, between Dunaverty Bay and Carskey in Kintyre, has two footprints carved at a place where St. Columba is reputed to have first set foot in Dalriada, Scotland. One is recent, and the other genuinely old. Kingship rituals may have been connected with this petrosomatoglyph.

St. Columba's footprints are to be found at Southend in Argyll. Two examples exist in Angus.

The caves below Keil Point on the Isle of Arran contain a slab which may have been an ancient altar. It has the prints of two right feet on it, said to be of Saint Columba.

The Giant Fingal of Arran is said to have had a son born in the King's Cave who left a 2-foot-long (0.61 m) footprint on the cave side.

On Islay, there was a Stone of Inauguration by Finlaggan. It was seven feet square and had footprints cut into it. When a chief of the Clan Donald was installed as the King of the Isles, he stood barefoot on the imprints on the stone, and with his father's stone in his hand, was anointed King by the Bishop of Argyll and seven priests. During the ceremony, an orator recited a list of his ancestors and, he was proclaimed "Macdonald, high prince of the seed of Conn". The block was deliberately destroyed in the early seventeenth century.

At Spittal, near Drymen, is a footprint which may be due to natural weathering. It is located at the western end of a long ridge of natural rock outcrop. A quarry for two millstones is nearby.

At Craigmaddie Muir, Baldernock, East Dunbartonshire is the Auld Wives Lifts. This is a complicated assemblage of carvings on a rock platform. On the rock are serpent-like forms, crosses, cups and an impression of the right foot of an adult.

At Dunino Den (56.28° N 02.76° W NO5311), near St Andrews in Fife, is a footprint and a basin carved in the surface of a sandstone outcrop. A Celtic cross has been carved nearby, possibly as an attempt to Christianise the site

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrosoma ... n_Scotland

Photos within.
http://scotiafile.blogspot.co.uk/2015/0 ... tland.html

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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:17 pm 
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Love those footprints.

Petrosomatoglyphs! ...there's a new word.

I'm interested in the The Devil's Footstep in the far-too-interesting-link that you posted above TCJ.....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrosoma ... #The_devil

"The devil could not enter a consecrated church and could only stand in the entrance foyer, stamping his foot furiously, leaving the footprint that remains visible in the church's entrance today.

The devil then rushed outside and manifested its evil spirit in the wind that furiously rages around the church.

Entrance foyer = communes

He's a wee devil that Chérisey.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:19 pm 
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of course, we know what devil he meant lol


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:24 pm 
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hmmm...good thinking Sandy, but I don't think so because the doors are described as glazed.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:25 pm 
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An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.


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PostPosted: 24 Apr 2017 8:29 pm 
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I think it's time to see Plantard was not so daft either.


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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 1:03 am 
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bergeredearcadie wrote:
of course, we know what devil he meant lol


Go on, be a devil. Tell us. :twisted:


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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 1:08 am 
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Pilrig wrote:
An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.


What's the article? Could you please post it if you have it, thank-you?

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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 1:10 am 
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Pilrig wrote:
Sheila wrote:
verte "pâte égyptienne"

Osiris the Egyptian god of the Underworld. ... Distinguished by his green face.
green - the color of rebirth.

essence de Bergamote

In the past, psoralen extracted from bergamot oil has been used in tanning accelerators and sunscreens. These substances were known to be photocarcinogenic since 1959, but they were only banned from sunscreens in 1995. These photocarcinogenic substances were banned years after they had caused many cases of malignant melanoma and deaths.



In the recipe book “A La Table de L’Abbé Saunière” by Josette Barthe the Abbé Saunière’s cure for baldness included oil of bergamot (Rennes Observer) It is possible he grew bergamot and produced the oil himself


Where does it say the recipe for baldness? Where does this come from?


Here is a short story about Bergamot I found while studying the historical precedence for the use of it, in the Chrism oil.
http://www.whitelotusaromatics.com/newsletters/bergamot
Quote:
Bergamot

Bergamot

In mid-day heat we take the precipitous road
to GŽmenos. Over a succulent valley
we pause in scents of pine and bergamot,
and all day the car brims with musk and honey
Below, the sound of water, a quick stream,
cedars of Lebanon, a Judas tree,
and, red-gold under cliffs, like an old moment
of faith in wilderness, a quiet abbey.
On the secret forest path, where water fans
its moonlight over limestone, two girls spread
a scarlet carpet on the rock. They scrub
under falling water, till the stream runs red.
Gillian Clarke-:Magdalene in Provence

... Here, in the bosom of the mountains, sheltered from the north and the east, where the western gales alone seemed to breathe, all the blooms of spring and the riches of autumn were united. Trees of myrtle bordered the road, which wound among groves of orange, lemon, and bergamot, whose delicious fragrance came to the sense mingled with the breath of roses and carnations that blossomed in their shade. The gently swelling hills that rose from the plain were covered with vines, and crowned with cypresses, olives and date trees; beyond, there appeared the sweep of lofty mountains whence the travellers had descended, and whence rose the little river Paglion, swollen by the snows that melt on their summits, and which, after meandering through the plain,washes the walls of Nice, where it falls into the Mediterranean. ..
Ann Ward Radcliffe: The Romance of the Forest

ETYMOLOGY of Bergamot French bergamote, from Italian bergamotta, from Turkish dialectal beg-armudu, bey's pear : beg, bey; see bey + armud, pear + -u, possessive suff.
ETYMOLOGY: Turkish, from Old Turkic beg, ruler, prince. Origin of the Tree- The origin of this tree is obscure both on a geographical and a botanical point of view. Among the various theories, one says that Christopher Colombus brought the plant back from the Antillas or the Canaries to Spain. It then reached Calabria from the town of Berga, near Barcelona, from where it took the name, bergamot. It seems that it was Mr. Valentino who bought the first bergamot tree from a Spanish moor in the XVth century and grafted it on to a lemon plant in Santa Caterina. Another theory by Mr. Chapot is that bergamot tree is an hybride and comes from a cross between bitter orange " bigarade " -C. aurantium LIN.- and the true Lime with small fruits - C. aurantifolia CHRISM. Several anatomical, pathological and historical datas support this opinion.

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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 5:35 am 
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Pilrig wrote:
An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.


Nice one

Now we know why the Paris Meridian (La Méridienne verte[) is being marked out with LIME trees - A Pagan symbol. de Cherisey just played with the words, like he does.

Picard has a pyramid dedicated to him at Juvisy-sur-Orge, a town on the Paris Meridian. Here you'll find this:

Image

The Observatory built by astronomer Camille Flammarion who is buried in Juvisy-sur-Orge.

Camille Flammarion, a Spiritist (as opposed to a spiritualist) wrote this:

Image

This belonged to Bérenger Saunière

Quote:
Spiritism postulates that humans are essentially immortal spirits that temporarily inhabit physical bodies for several necessary incarnations to attain moral and intellectual improvement. It also asserts that spirits, through passive or active mediumship, may have beneficent or maleficent influence on the physical world.


Cathar Belief?

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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 5:47 am 
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But here's question

Why is it La Méridienne verte?

Feminine.

Is it because of the prefix "Méri"?

and the habit of carving statues of Mary Magdalene in LIME WOOD

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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 6:11 am 
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Pilrig wrote:
An article by Pierre Plantard on the Paris meridian in Vaincre which was mentioned in the Rennes Observer suggests that an enormous lime-tree [tilleul] at Fort Mardyck formed the subject of a play on words by the poet, satirist and translator Thomas Murner (1475 - 1537) during the reign of Charles V. He nicknamed it “Tilleul/Miroir”, (lime tree /mirror) or in Franco-Flemish “Tilleul en Spiegel”, because the vertical meridian split the Hexagon (France) into two equal surface areas. This suggested to Murner, the punster, the French word espiègle [mischievous] associated with Till, the legendary hero. This giant tree was felled in 1670 on the orders of Picard the geographer, one of the first to have official responsibility for marking out the Paris Zero Meridian.
Another article on the Paris meridian by Pierre Plantard in Le Cercle is much more straightforward and factual and devoid of anecdotes.

That's a keeper Pilrig. 8)

I'm going to add it to Footnote 26 for Chapter XIII - if that's OK by you.

It would be good to get the specific citation (including page number) for either or both Vainacre or/and Rennes Observer though.


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 Post subject: Re: A lonely sole.
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 6:28 am 
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Sheila wrote:
It's always difficult to figure out what you guys know or don't know...like the situation you had with David-Leroy for instance. I assumed everybody knew that Leroy meant the king...Leroy is a very common name in France.

I never spotted that Lime is an anagram of mile - that's excellent Roscoe.


So...things that are obvious to one are not instantly obvious to others.

Take the footprint.

There are quite a few....

We have footprints of Buddha carved in stone.


And Christ/God left a famous one just up the road from me at l'Abbaye Sainte-Croix de Poitiers........Sainte Radegonde's gaff.

Her monastic cell/oratoire called "la chapelle du Pas de Dieu" - the Chapel of God's Footprint, has the "footprint of Christ" in it.
....Christ left it behind in the stone after her vision when he told her "You are the pearl in my crown."

However, because everything since the year dot either got Romanised or churchified we need to peer behind the veil and go back further in time....viz Osiris.
The soles of his feet that had trodden the earth were removed in order that he might tread the Hall of Judgement with pure feet and that "his feet were bathed with milk that the pain thereof might be assuaged".


And the other side of the coin is when the Egyptian kings visited the shrine to Osiris...they were very careful NOT to leave footprints when they had a meeting with the Gods Osiris, Isis & Horus in their individual shrines.

The king was very careful to erase his footprints with a broom on the way out...



Charlot blew it though...he put his foot in it.

It's all about the immortality of the Soul.

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His feet as white as milk.

And his face as green as a mummy's.


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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 8:07 am 
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Now for something Weird

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Meridian Man (or Woman) holding up El Hierro.

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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 8:24 am 
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Hot volcanic debris spreading after an underwater vent erupted way back in October 2011, sending ash and chemicals into the sea and causing muddy discoloration of the waters south of the island....you can see the underwater plume being dispersed in the currents.
You can see the new island forming on the southernmost tip.


Last edited by Sheila on 25 Apr 2017 8:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 25 Apr 2017 8:25 am 
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Sheila wrote:
Seriously dubious.


I remember now that I read it in a travel guide of El Hierro.

I was on La Gomera and wanted to travel to El Hierro

Travelling there is no problem, staying there is.

The tower is at Valverde.

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Last edited by roscoe on 25 Apr 2017 8:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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