Arcadia Discussion Zone

Forums dedicated to history's mysteries, Rennes-le-Château and beyond…

Read the Arcadia Forum House Rules

It is currently 24 Nov 2017 6:37 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 17 Oct 2009 5:28 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
The Lobineau document deposited in the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris entitled
“Secret files of Henri Lobineau: Monsignor count de Rhédae, duke de Razes, the legitimate heir descended from Clovis 1st king of the Franks”.

The document contains the following sentence:

“The business of Rennes le Chateau touches all the Languedoc, it even causes a small war between secret services. A case amongst others, the disappearance of the leather case of Leo Schidlof transported by a certain Fakhar-Ul-Islam. This leather case contained the acts as well as the secret files of Rennes between 1600 and 1900 and was to be given February 17th 1967 to an agent delegated by Geneva in West Germany. However Fakhar was expelled and was found in Orly February 16th. In Paris he awaited orders. He met on the 18th a certain Herbert Regis, engineer;”

Again was someone using newspaper articles to include them or was there something to this? Nevertheless both the curious death of the three supposed authors of Le Serpent Rouge and the curious death of Fakhar-Ul-Islam falling from a train and travelling across France without any luggage is, to say the least a remarkable coincidence.

The case of Fakhar-Ul-Islam

1967 was a very significant year in this saga for in addition to the publication of de Chérisey’s book and the deaths of the supposed writers of Le Serpent Rouge we have another suspicious death reported in a Paris daily on Tuesday February 21st. of that year. A Pakistani by the name of Fakhar-Ul-Islam was found lying at the side of the railway line near to Melun and is presumed to have fallen from the Paris to Geneva train at around 11pm on the 20th February (his watch had stopped at 11:27). His body was found by the station master of Melun at 4 am. Ul-Islam was 21 years old and according to the police carried dozens of visas of various European countries however he also carried a decree of expulsion from West Germany. This document carried photographs of other persons some in turbans and some Europeans. A curious thing is that Ul-Islam was clothed very elegantly and yet when the police searched on the train for his baggage none was found. Who travels across Europe from the French capital to Geneva with only the contents of his pockets?

Let me just add that I treat the Lobineau Document with suspicion. However treating things with suspicion has NEVER meant dismissing the entire contents as fraud.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Oct 2009 3:05 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2009 3:29 am
Posts: 8932
Location: Texas
Roscoe well said

Quote:
Let me just add that I treat the Lobineau Document with suspicion. However treating things with suspicion has NEVER meant dismissing the entire contents as fraud.


Lets just look at these ACTIONS
take the words out

we have
Quote:
1967 was a very significant year in this saga for in addition to the publication of de Chérisey’s book and the deaths of the supposed writers of Le Serpent Rouge we have another suspicious death reported in a Paris daily on Tuesday February 21st. of that year. A Pakistani by the name of Fakhar-Ul-Islam was found lying at the side of the railway line near to Melun and is presumed to have fallen from the Paris to Geneva train at around 11pm on the 20th February (his watch had stopped at 11:27). His body was found by the station master of Melun at 4 am. Ul-Islam was 21 years old and according to the police carried dozens of visas of various European countries however he also carried a decree of expulsion


whats the number of deaths 3 Serpent Rouge writers and one Pakistani


Ok lets look at the Vatican

1967 and the creation of 'Les Dossiers Secrets d'Henri Lobineau' as compiled by Philippe Toscan du Plantier and deposited in the Bibliothèque Nationale in France – what significance was there between Pope John XXIII and Jean Cocteau, the fictional Grand Master of the fictional Priory of Sion?

Interesting piece of mythmaking here by both Pierre Plantard and Philippe de Chèrisey when creating 'Les Dossiers Secrets d'Henri Lobineau' and the mythological pedigree of the Priory of Sion in 1967. Between 1918 and 1963 the fictional Grand Master of the fictional Priory of Sion was Jean Cocteau – who also bore the title of Jean XXIII. The Pope between the years 1958 – 1963 was Cardinal Roncalli, who took the name of Pope John XXIII.


He called the Second Vatican Council (1962–1965) but did not live to see it to completion, dying on June 3, 1963,

but there is MORE

President Vincent Auriol of France claimed the ancient privilege possessed by French monarchs and bestowed the red hat on the now-Cardinal Roncalli at a ceremony in the Elysee Palace.


Upon his election, Cardinal Roncalli chose John as his regnal name. This was the first time in over 500 years that this name had been chosen - previous Popes had avoided using this name as the last bishop of Rome to use this name came to be considered an Antipope following the Western Schism.

and more
On the choice of his name Pope John said that

I choose John ... a name sweet to us because it is the name of our father, dear to me because it is the name of the humble parish church where I was baptized, the solemn name of numberless cathedrals scattered throughout the world, including our own basilica [St. John Lateran]. Twenty-two Johns of indisputable legitimacy have [been Pope], and almost all had a brief pontificate. We have preferred to hide the smallness of our name behind this magnificent succession of Roman Popes. [4]

Upon choosing the name, there was some confusion as to whether the new Pope would be known as John XXIII or John XXIV. In response, John declared that he was John XXIII, thus affirming the antipapal status of Antipope John XXIII.

Before this Antipope, the most recent Popes called John were John XXII (1316–1334) and John XXI (1276–1277). However, there was no Pope John XX, due to confusion caused by medieval historians misreading the Liber Pontificalis to refer to another Pope John between John XIV and John XV.


One wonders what Plantard thought of John XXIII

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope_John_XXIII

http://priory-of-sion.com/posd/traditionalist.html

_________________
Everything is Connected and there are no
coincidences


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Oct 2009 5:33 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Quote:
“The business of Rennes le Chateau touches all the Languedoc, it even causes a small war between secret services. A case amongst others, the disappearance of the leather case of Leo Schidlof transported by a certain Fakhar-Ul-Islam. This leather case contained the acts as well as the secret files of Rennes between 1600 and 1900 and was to be given February 17th 1967 to an agent delegated by Geneva in West Germany. However Fakhar was expelled and was found in Orly February 16th. In Paris he awaited orders. He met on the 18th a certain Herbert Regis, engineer;”


Hey Roscoe if you've got anymore of this stuff could you do us favour and post it. I'd be interested to see it.
BTW Good job on Operation Gladio & Annemesse. I think I learnt a lot.

Quote:
Let me just add that I treat the Lobineau Document with suspicion. However treating things with suspicion has NEVER meant dismissing the entire contents as fraud.


I agree with you.

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Oct 2009 5:47 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Quote:
Again was someone using newspaper articles to include them or was there something to this? Nevertheless both the curious death of the three supposed authors of Le Serpent Rouge and the curious death of Fakhar-Ul-Islam falling from a train and travelling across France without any luggage is, to say the least a remarkable coincidence.


You want to hear something funny what if Fakhar-Ul-Islam was the luggage. :lol:

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Oct 2009 6:09 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Quote:
whats the number of deaths 3 Serpent Rouge writers and one Pakistani


When they say pakistani there actually talking about the Hashshashin as priests not "Assassins" and if I'm correct something else...

Don't forget your "rule of four" Lov and the knights move. Three up one across. :wink:

3 le serpent rouge writers and 1 pakistani. :wink:

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 18 Oct 2009 5:06 pm 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2009 3:29 am
Posts: 8932
Location: Texas
OMG!!! Rain how true that is
Quote:
Don't forget your "rule of four" Lov and the knights move. Three up one across.



Hashshashin
The Hashshashin (also Hashishin, Hashashiyyin, or Hashasheen) from which the word assassin is thought to originate, was the Arabic designation of the Nizari branch of the Ismā'īlī Shia Muslims during the Middle Ages.

followers of Hassan (which refers to the group's master Hassan-i Sabbah).

The word Hashish (of probable Persian origin) refers to resin collected from cannabis flowers. An accurate definition of the word in Persian is actually "healers" or "herb sellers."
Masonic orders like the Knights Templar and the Illuminati may well have based their ideas of a secret order searching for enlightenment on the Hashshashin, upon their return to Europe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashshashin

as for that he was the luggage
:shock: How spooky is that

_________________
Everything is Connected and there are no
coincidences


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 12:01 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
DECODING FAKHAR-UL-ISLAM
WHY PAKISTANI?


Quote:
Alborz
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mount Damavand, Iran's tallest mountain is located in Alborz mountain range.Alborz ( listen (help·info) Persian: البرز), also written as Alburz or Elburz, is a mountain range in northern Iran stretching from the borders of Armenia in the northwest to the southern end of the Caspian Sea, and ending in the east at the borders of Turkmenistan and Afghanistan. The tallest mountain in the Middle East, Mount Damavand, is located in the range.

The Alborz mountain range forms a barrier between the south Caspian and the Qazvin-Tehran plateau. It is only 60-130 km wide and consists of sedimentary series dating from Upper Devonian to Oligocene, prevalently Jurassic limestone over a granite core. Its higher elevations, in the Elburz Range forest steppe ecoregion, are arid with few trees, but its northern slopes, in the Caspian Hyrcanian mixed forests ecoregion, are lush and forested.

Zoroastrians may identify the range with the dwelling place of the Peshyotan, and the Zoroastrian Ilm-e-Kshnoom sect identify Mount Davamand as the home of the Saheb-e-Dilan ('Masters of the Heart'). In his epic Shahnameh, the poet Ferdowsi speaks of the mountains "as though they lay in India."[1] This could reflect older usage, for numerous high peaks were given the name and some even reflect it to this day. For example, Mount Elbrus in the Caucasus Mountains, and Mount Elbariz (Albariz) in the Kirman area above the Straits of Hormuz. As recently as the 19th century, a peak in the northernmost range in the Hindu Kush system, just south of Balkh, was recorded as Mount Elburz in British army maps. All these names reflect the same Iranian language compound, and share an identification as the legendary mountain Harā Bərəzaitī of the Avesta.

Also due to its great snowy winters there are several ski resorts, some consider that a few of these are among the best in the world. Some of most important ones are: Dizin, Shemshak, Tochal, and Darbandsar.


Quote:
[edit] Myths and Legends
The library of Alamut was destroyed, along with much of their Persian power base, and thus much of the sect's own records were lost; most accounts of them stem from Arab historians of the period and Marco Polo's accounts. Most Muslim contemporaries were hostile toward Nizari; in fact they were described using the term Batini. The term was sometimes used pejoratively to refer to those, especially Isma'ili, who discerned an inner, esoteric level of meaning (batin) in the Qur'an. This constant religious estrangement would eventually see them go as far as allying with Western Christian invaders against Muslims on a number of occasions when it suited their interests.

Much of the current lore surrounding the Assassins roots from Marco Polo, who claimed to have visited Alamut in 1273 during his journey east (a visit widely considered fictional since the stronghold had been destroyed by the Mongols in 1256). Polo wrote that future assassins were subjected an initiation rite in which they were drugged to simulate "dying," and later awakened in a garden flowing with wine and served a sumptuous feast by beautiful virgins. The supplicant was then convinced he was in Heaven and that the sect's leader, Hassan-i Sabbah, was a representation of the divinity and that all his orders should be followed, even unto death. Other legends of the Hashshashin are sourced to returning Crusaders from the Levant who claimed to have encountered Syrian Nizari leader Rashid ad-Din Sinan (the old man of the mountain) in the fortress of Masyaf.

The use of intoxicants is never mentioned in contemporary Ismaili sources, nor from rival Sunnis and Shia, despite their suffering from Hashshashin assassinations. For example, Farhad Daftary in The Assassin Legends: Myths of the Isma'ilis[1] says: "At the same time, within the crusading-culture of a pre- and early-modern Europe, the Syrian and Persian Nizaris took shape as Muslim mercenaries who murdered their victims while high on opium or hashish. If this propagandist concoction of a 'stoned' assassin fails to fit the complex reality of the discipline and training required for committing what was always an explicitly political act, the popular notion of Nizaris as a community of killers also denies their rich, multivalent culture."

Edward Burman, in his The Assassins - Holy Killers of Islam says: "There is no mention of that drug [hashish] in connection with the Persian Assassins - especially in the library of Alamut ('the secret archives')." Additionally, the Encyclopedia of the Orient[8] refutes this allegation. Indeed Hassan-i Sabbah is recorded as being particularly harsh with users of intoxicants. He felt intoxicants undermined the strict discipline required for the Nizari to survive. He made a public example of his two sons by executing them for drinking alcohol, which he believed set a bad example for a community facing such insurmountable odds. Benjamin of Tudela who traveled one hundred years before Marco Polo mentions the Al-Hashshashin and their leader in the fertile crescent Al-Sinan whom the crusaders dubbed "the Old Man of the Mountain". He notes their principal city to be Qadmous.

Modern scholarship began[when?] with Soviet scientists, who in order to better understand communities existing within their vast empire, set about conducting surveys and discovered small Isma'ili communities isolated by treacherous terrain living within central Asia. Professor Vladimir Alexeyevich Ivanov, a Russian Orientalist, collected and published copies of these documents


View of Alamut besieged.from Alamut. Including first-hand accounts, accompanied by his commentary of the Hashshashin from original sources. The Nizari continue the work started by the Soviets, and later Western scholars collecting, preserving and publishing literary works from Nizari Isma'ili communities. In 1977 the Institute of Ismaili Studies was set up in order to publish scholarly work by leading academics on the Nizari. Much of this work deals with the Hashshashin period, including their history, science, and philosophy[citation needed].


If you remember Louvian my run in with the Stiletto incident thought I might do a bit more reasearch this time. :lol:

IN CONCLUSION: The term Pakistani in this context is not referring to a person or geography but it is a code based on the *"mythical library Hashshashin" and furthermore identifies an article. :D
It is a concept rather the term that "Author" is trying to portray.
By using the obscure term Pakistani they were to able to have plausible deniability for both themselves and the receivers of the message.

*(see library of RLC for further details - architectural section - secured section)
:wink: :mrgreen:

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 1:14 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
DECODING LEO SCHIDLOF
WHY LEO SCHIDLOF?


A case amongst others, the disappearance of the leather case of Leo Schidlof transported by a

Quote:
http://openlibrary.org/b/OL5726988M/miniature_in_Europe_in_the_16th_17th_18th_and_19th_centuries

The miniature in Europe in the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries
by Leo R. Schidlof
Published in 1964, Akademische Druck- u. Verlagsanstalt (Graz)


The miniature in Europe in the 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries
Leo R. SchidlofChange Cover By statement: [by] Leo R. Schidlof.
Language: English
Pagination: 4 v. (ix, 1069 p.)
LCCN: 70474582
Dewey: 757/.7/094
LC: ND1337.E9 S3
Subject: Miniature painting — Europe.
Miniature painters — Europe — Biography.

Quote:
Gentleman in Cap, Signed by Johann Friedrich Leybold, Circa 1790
A German portrait miniature of a gentleman with green eyes and strawberry blond hair, wearing a cap and a banyan (or morning gown), over a cream-colored shirt and cravat, against a brown background. The painting is signed at the lower right: Leybold Fec:, and is set in a gilt pendant frame, the reverse with glazed black silk.

Male sitters in the 18th century often had themselves painted wearing a turban-like cap in place of a periwig, and a morning gown over shirt and trousers, to indicate that they were men of scholarship, artistry or philosophical leanings, and, implicitly, to indicate wealth, since they were at leisure. It's interesting to note that in the humid climate of Colonial Virginia, gentlemen wore lightweight banyans as informal street wear in the summer months.

It's possible, given the humorous and self-aware expression of the sitter, that this is a self-portrait.

Johann Friedrich Leybold (1755-1838) was born in Stuttgart, Germany. As a youth he studied at the Karlsschule, as well as Adam Bauer's, and Sonnenschein's. His painting master was Guibal, and his engraving master was G.v. Muller. In 1781 he became engraver to the Court of Wurttemberg, and also painted miniatures. From 1789 to 1794 he was a teacher at the Karlsschule, and in 1798 he settled in Vienna, where he painted many members of the Austrian aristocracy. He usually signed: Leybold Fec.

Leybold's three sons Karl Jakob Theodor, Heinrich Gustaf Adolf and Eduard Friedrich were all painters and miniaturists. Schidlof says of him: "Johann Friedrich Leybold was a superior artist, and his miniatures are expressive."
Dimensions: 3 3/8 x 2 ¾ inches.

Quote:
Stanislaw Marszalkiewicz
Title General Count Fiodor Nesselrode
Medium miniature on ivory
Size 4.8 x 0 in. / 12.2 x 0 cm.
Description STANISLAW MARSZALKIEWICZ (POLISH, 1789-1872)
General Count Fiodor Nesselrode (1786-1868) in dark green uniform with silver-embroidered red collar, silver epaulettes, wearing the Commander cross and breast-star of the Royal Prussian Order of the Red Eagle (2nd class), the breast-star of the Imperial Russian Order of St. Stanislas, the badges of the Imperial Russian Order of St. Vladimir, the Royal Swedish Order of the Sword (4th class) and the Imperial Russian medals for 15 Years of Faithful Military Service and for the Taking of Paris 1814; sky background
signed 'Marszalkiewicz' (mid-right)
on ivory
oval, 4 13/16 in. (122 mm.) high, gilt-metal mount within rectangular lacquered metal frame
Misc. Signed
Sale Of Christie's London: Tuesday, December 9, 2008 [Lot 1]
Important Portrait Miniatures and Gold Boxes
Estimate 4,000 - 6,000 BP (5,988 - 8,982 US$)
Sold For 8,125 BP (11,982 US$) PREMIUM Currency Converter
Provenance Leo R. Schidlof (1886-1966) Collection, Vienna/London, by 1924.
Christie's, London, 3 March 1993, lot 94.
Bonhams, London, 5 November 2002, lot 112
Exhibition Vienna, Albertina, Internationale Miniaturenausstellung in der Albertina Wien, Vienna, 1924, no. 586 (lent by Leo R. Schidlof).
Vienna, Albertina, Meisterwerke der europäischen Miniaturmalerei 1750-1850, 1965, no. 276
Literature L. R. Schidlof, The Miniature in Europe, Graz, 1964, II, p. 535, illustrated IV, pl. 389, no. 793


IN CONCLUSION: It is the nature of the career Leo Shidlof that has been highlighted rather than the actual person. By highlighting the career we will find a description of the contents of the leather case.
Leo Shidlof
1) Antiquities dealer
2) Miniatures dealer
3) Fine Portrait Miniatures/intaglio's
4) Evaluation/assessor
5) Author of books relating to Antique miniatures
6) Dealer in collections for public/private auctions
7) Owner of collections

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 1:37 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
DECODING THE BUSINESS OF RENNES LE CHATEAU TOUCHES ALL THE LANGUEDOC, IT EVEN CAUSES A SMALL WAR BETWEEN BETWEEN SECRET SERVICES.
WHY THE BUSINESS OF RENNES LE CHATEAU TOUCHES ALL THE LANGUEDOC, IT EVEN CAUSES A SMALL WAR BETWEEN BETWEEN SECRET SERVICES AS AN INTRODUCTION?

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 3:30 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2009 3:29 am
Posts: 8932
Location: Texas
Quote:
DECODING THE BUSINESS OF RENNES LE CHATEAU TOUCHES ALL THE LANGUEDOC, IT EVEN CAUSES A SMALL WAR BETWEEN BETWEEN SECRET SERVICES.


well Rain
lets see
we have the
CIA
Mossad
Interpol
and the
KGB

Oh and theres the British Secret Service
Since the time of Elizabeth I, British secret services have worked according to the principle of ‘the end justifies the means’. Money, bribery, blackmail – these are their recruitment methods...
– Nikolai Patrushev, head of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), October 2007

It is not really surprising that historically occultism and espionage have often been strange bedfellows. The black art of espionage is about obtaining secret information and witches, psychics and astrologers have always claimed to be able to predict the future and know about things hidden from ordinary people.

Gathering intelligence is carried out under a cloak of secrecy and occultists are adept at keeping their activities concealed from sight. Like secret agents they also use codes, symbols and cryptograms to hide information from outsiders. Occultists and intelligence officers are similar in many ways, as both inhabit a shadowy underworld of secrets, deception and disinformation. It is therefore not unusual that often these two professions have shared the same members.
The ‘father of the British Secret Service’ was the Elizabethan lawyer, politician, diplomat and spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham. He was a Protestant and as a young man during the bloody reign of the Catholic Queen Mary was forced to flee abroad to escape persecution. While in exile, Walsingham learnt Italian and French and became acquainted with the work of the famous Venetian Secret Service that used its spying skills for trade and commerce under the cloak of diplomacy.

so I could see how Rennes could get two agencies fighting

http://www.newdawnmagazine.com/Article/The_British_Occult_Secret_Service.html

_________________
Everything is Connected and there are no
coincidences


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 4:02 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Sorry Lov, I was going to finish the post. I'm going to decode it differently. This one isn't made by any Intelligence Agency it's too Amatuerish, it's made to be broken publicly and there is no cryptography. It's not using any sophisticated coding or crypting unless it's taken in the context of all the files in which case it's still not an Intelligence Agency it's hermetic. Intelligence Agencies are only arms, when it comes to this. I'm sure they have more practical things to do like (war-mongering, insurgencies, renditions, political machinations, assasinations, kindnappings, border patrol & world domination) you know the usual stuff. :wink: :mrgreen:

And anyway I can barely do sudoku, let alone any real code cracking they ain't gonna be opening a big can of whoop-arse on me anytime soon, let's put it that way. :lol:

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 8:01 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
lovuian wrote:
Quote:
DECODING THE BUSINESS OF RENNES LE CHATEAU TOUCHES ALL THE LANGUEDOC, IT EVEN CAUSES A SMALL WAR BETWEEN BETWEEN SECRET SERVICES.


well Rain
lets see
we have the
CIA
Mossad
Interpol
and the
KGB

Oh and theres the British Secret Service
Since the time of Elizabeth I, British secret services have worked according to the principle of ‘the end justifies the means’. Money, bribery, blackmail – these are their recruitment methods...
– Nikolai Patrushev, head of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), October 2007

It is not really surprising that historically occultism and espionage have often been strange bedfellows. The black art of espionage is about obtaining secret information and witches, psychics and astrologers have always claimed to be able to predict the future and know about things hidden from ordinary people.

Gathering intelligence is carried out under a cloak of secrecy and occultists are adept at keeping their activities concealed from sight. Like secret agents they also use codes, symbols and cryptograms to hide information from outsiders. Occultists and intelligence officers are similar in many ways, as both inhabit a shadowy underworld of secrets, deception and disinformation. It is therefore not unusual that often these two professions have shared the same members.
The ‘father of the British Secret Service’ was the Elizabethan lawyer, politician, diplomat and spymaster Sir Francis Walsingham. He was a Protestant and as a young man during the bloody reign of the Catholic Queen Mary was forced to flee abroad to escape persecution. While in exile, Walsingham learnt Italian and French and became acquainted with the work of the famous Venetian Secret Service that used its spying skills for trade and commerce under the cloak of diplomacy.

so I could see how Rennes could get two agencies fighting

http://www.newdawnmagazine.com/Article/The_British_Occult_Secret_Service.html


Well Elizabeth's Conjurer John Dee (who used to sign his name 007) spent some time in Louvain with Cornelius Agrippa and spent some time with The Measurers. Did that fact influence your username?

Of course it was during the height of Dee's influence that the Statute Mile we still use today was adopted in England, seemingly from nowhere. The Statute Mile has a direct integer relationship with the radius of the earth.

The word Geometry literally means Earth Measurement by the way. Dee taught celestial and solar navigation to Elizabeth's Navy.

Image

This is dated 1584 and is contemporary with Dee and is pretty damned advanced for the time. You might like to note the Zodiac symbols arround the edge of the inside circle.

This is priceless, it shows that they understood how to plot longitude in the 16th century, without a clock.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Last edited by roscoe on 19 Oct 2009 8:19 am, edited 9 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 8:07 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Dee worked for a powerful royal family. I haven't told you what I think Secret Services means in this context yet. :wink:

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 9:02 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
rain wrote:
Dee worked for a powerful royal family. I haven't told you what I think Secret Services means in this context yet. :wink:


I presume you know about Dee's 48 Claves Angelicae.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 10:11 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
I used to have a photo of a stained glass window with
Dee doing a hand of mysteries style knighting to Bacon.

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 4:26 pm 
Offline
Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: 10 Jun 2009 3:17 pm
Posts: 1412
Location: Sunny Florida
Was Lobineau Leo Schidlof, the miniaturist? You'll notice this is one of the few cases where HBHG presents disconfirming evidence. BLL describe interviewing his daughter and she said she had no knowledge of him ever showing any interest in Merovingian geneaology. Yet there is one genuine strange aspect to his biography -- she mentions he tried to apply for a visa to the U.S. and was denied on suspicion of espionage. Hmmm?

There is an alternative theory offered. In the 1970s, some "peedox" said Lobineau wasn't really Schidlof, and that the name was derived from the street that runs by St. Sulpice, on which a Count Henri de Lenoncourt lived. Lenoncourt was said to be Lobineau.

No one has ever been able to track down this Comte -- probably due to the fact that he died in 1477.

http://fabpedigree.com/s016/f280040.htm

But there is an interesting aspect to his name being chosen.

The SoP folks point out ... his name is one of the dedications for the French edition of the Hypnerotomachia ...

In the French edition of the Dream of Poliphili, there is a dedication to Sir Henri de Lenoncourt. Is it a coincidence that it is this Count de Lenoncourt who signs with the pseudonym Lobineau and Schidlof, the pseudo-authors of the “Dossiers Secrets”?

_________________
-- They call me the seeker, I've been searching low and high.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 5:47 pm 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2009 3:29 am
Posts: 8932
Location: Texas
Yes Roscoe
Louvain and Lovuian
is a play on the letters

:wink:

And yes look at Agrippa's famous saying
very close to my signature

He said: "Nothing is concealed from the wise and sensible, while the unbelieving and unworthy cannot learn the secrets." He emphasized: "All things which are similar and therefore connected, are drawn to each other's power." This is known as the law of resonance.

My signature is
Everything is connected and there are no coincidences

One of my favorite works of his

# Declamatio de nobilitate et praecellentia foeminei sexus (Declamation on the Nobility and Preeminence of the Female Sex, 1529[1]), a book pronouncing the theological and moral superiority of women. Edition with English translation, London 1670[2]

:lol: :lol: :lol:


Agrippa was all about secrets and so was Dee
they were tapping into many forces

_________________
Everything is Connected and there are no
coincidences


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 19 Oct 2009 6:04 pm 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 13 Jan 2009 3:29 am
Posts: 8932
Location: Texas
Ok there is the House of Rohan
remember Tolkien

married a Lenoncourt

Hercule de Rohan, Duc de Montbazon, Pr de Guemene, etc, Gov of Picardy and Paris (1568-
1654); m.1st 1594 Madeleine de Lenoncourt (1576-1602); m.2d 1628 Marie de Bretagne
d'Avaugour (1610-1657)

http://www.maltagenealogy.com/libro%20d%27Oro/rohan.html


the House of Rohan go way back

Nicolas Poussin (15 June 1594 – 19 November 1665)

He perhaps knew Poussin

_________________
Everything is Connected and there are no
coincidences


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 12:07 am 
Offline
Grand Master
User avatar

Joined: 29 Jul 2009 11:35 pm
Posts: 347
Location: New Zealand
Roscoe your picture is of a terrestial astrolabe, as opposed to a celestial astrolabe.

They are basically the same device, and some early astrolabes had two sides for celestial and terrestial, or interchangeable plates. They allow the calculation of lattitude, but unfortunately they don't overcome the problem of calculating longitude at sea which requires a chronograph.

The Rennes-le-Chateau and Bornholm landscape layouts would have provided the necessary observations to calculate the size of the Earth, and fix the legth of measures such as the mile, and perform the observations needed to calibrate an astrolabe, which despite its limitations was a revolutionary device in C12th Europe.

IMNSHO Bornholm and RLC layouts could also enable calcuation of the difference in longitude between fixed points such as between Bourges and Delphi. However they were not portable.

Although with determination, sticking close to land when possible, and taking a compass bearing in open expanses of water you could get to most places. It worked for the Vikings.

_________________
The Holy Grail has been found at Rennes-le-Chateau. Read all about it at http://www.theholygrail.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 7:52 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
Seeker1 wrote:
Was Lobineau Leo Schidlof, the miniaturist? You'll notice this is one of the few cases where HBHG presents disconfirming evidence. BLL describe interviewing his daughter and she said she had no knowledge of him ever showing any interest in Merovingian geneaology. Yet there is one genuine strange aspect to his biography -- she mentions he tried to apply for a visa to the U.S. and was denied on suspicion of espionage. Hmmm?

There is an alternative theory offered. In the 1970s, some "peedox" said Lobineau wasn't really Schidlof, and that the name was derived from the street that runs by St. Sulpice, on which a Count Henri de Lenoncourt lived. Lenoncourt was said to be Lobineau.

No one has ever been able to track down this Comte -- probably due to the fact that he died in 1477.

http://fabpedigree.com/s016/f280040.htm

But there is an interesting aspect to his name being chosen.

The SoP folks point out ... his name is one of the dedications for the French edition of the Hypnerotomachia ...

In the French edition of the Dream of Poliphili, there is a dedication to Sir Henri de Lenoncourt. Is it a coincidence that it is this Count de Lenoncourt who signs with the pseudonym Lobineau and Schidlof, the pseudo-authors of the “Dossiers Secrets”?


Well Rue Lobineau runs between the churches of Saint Sulpice and Saint Germain and de Cherisey stayed near there for a while, undoubtedly Lobineau is a psuedonym.

Don't forget we have this Lionel Burrus affair and his letters to the Catholic Weekly of Geneva who claimed to speak on behalf of the Swiss Christian Youth. In his letter he said that Leo Schidlof (Henri Lobineau) died in Vienna the week before the letter on October 17th 1966. Al Islam and the three Le Serpent Rouge writers died early 1967.

In the letter Burrus claims that the Lobineau document is:

"a remarkable study on the genealogy of the Merovingian kings and the affair of Rennes le Chateau"

The letter is worth mentioning if only in the context that it is all made up, but one begs the question why. The letter is cranky. Burrus goes on about the emblem of the French petrol company Antar-Pètroles (merged with ELF in 1967) which according to him supposedly represents a cartoon depiction of a Merovingian king (Looks more like a Viking to me).

Burrus concludes:

"For all those who knew Henri Lobineau who was a great voyager and a great seeker, a loyal and good man, he remains in our hearts as a symbol of a 'maître parfait' whom one repects and venerates."

But Burrus quotes several times a Roman Catholic bulletin which appears to attack Lobineau. Burrus says the RC bulletin accuses Lobineau of being pro Soviet, "a notorious Freemason" and actively preparing the way for a popular monarchy in France.

This, according to Burrus, this is what this missing RC bulletin said:

"The Merovingian descendants have always been behind all heresies from Arianism, through the Cathars and the Templars, to Freemasonry. At the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, Cardinal Mazarin, in July 1659, had their chateau of Barberie, dating from the twelfth century destroyed. For the house and family in question, all through the centuries, had spawned nothing but secret agitators against the church."

Well now a suppose that all of this will be given the de-Cherisey-done-it treatment and indeed de Cherisey does mention the Chateau Barberie in another writing of his where he described it as the "devint le bastion occulte de la France". The chateau was apparantly built by Bera VI.

The Chateau Barberie was in Nevers which according to an old map went under the name of

NOIS.

Image

Bernadette Soubirous (who saw Our Lady of Lourdes) is buried in Nevers.

The Duke de Nevers was in fact Louis de Gonzaga and Sauniere paraded the statute of Our Lady of Lourdes around Rennes le Chateau on the feast of Louis de Gonzague. Sauniere specifically mentioned him by name.

Louis de Gonzague knew Robert Fludd's father who was the treasurer of the military contingent sent by Elizabeth I in support of the French King. Robert Fludd succeeded Louis de Nevers (Gonzague) as a PoS Grand Master. The predessesor of Louis de Nevers was Ferdinand de Gonzague who had been a patron of Leonardo da Vinci. There is a connection between the Gonzague family, Robert Fludd, Robert Boyle and the Chateau de Joyeuse just north of Couiza.

Now for the cherry on the cake.

Louis de Nevers (Louis de Gonzague) spent some time in England with no less a person than John Dee.

He also spent some time with Sir Philip Sydney who wrote 'Arcadia'

Sir Philip Sidney, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia. 1590

Mary Sidney (His sister), Countess of Pembroke, A Dialogue betweene two Shepheards, Thenot and Piers, in praise of Astrea.

The Sidneys were the nephew and neice respectively of Lady Jane Grey who had been Queen for just over a week and subsequently executed.

A publication with which Elizabeth Anson (of Shugborough Hall) became almost obseessed with. It was she who commissioned the Shepherd Monument in the grounds of Shugborough Hall and it was she who meticulously copied Poussin's Les Bergers d'Arcadie from nearby Chatsworth House.

I was at Shugborough Hall this sunday

Perhaps I should add that Elizabeth Anson was the wife of an Admiral renowned for his navigational skills.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Last edited by roscoe on 20 Oct 2009 10:43 am, edited 4 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 9:26 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Quote:
But Burrus quotes several times a Roman Catholic bulletin which appears to attack Lobineau. Burrus says the RC bulletin accuses Lobineau of being pro Soviet, "a notorious Freemason" and actively preparing the way for a popular monarchy in France.


It sounds like they're calling him a communist slut who wants to be King. This is worthy of Shakespeare. :lol:

Quote:
"The Merovingian descendants have always been behind all heresies from Arianism, through the Cathars and the Templars, to Freemasonry. At the beginning of the Protestant Reformation, Cardinal Mazarin, in July 1659, had their chateau of Barberie, dating from the twelfth century destroyed. For the house and family in question, all through the centuries, had spawned nothing but secret agitators against the church."


I've always enjoyed Burrus's take on things.

Quote:
The Prieuré de Sion
"According to the 'Prieuré documents' Sion's opposition to Mazarin provoked bitter retribution from the cardinal. Among the chief victims of this retribution are said to have been the Plantard family--lineal descendants of Dagobert II and the Merovingian dynasty. In 1548, the 'Prieuré documents' state, Jean des Plantard had married Marie de Saint-Clair--thus forging another link between his family and that of the Saint-Clair/Gisors. By that time, too, the Plantard family was supposedly established at a certain Chateau Barberie near Nevers, in the Nivernais region of France. This chateau supposedly constituted the Plantards' official residence for the next century. Then, on July 11, 1659, according to the 'Prieuré documents,' Mazarin ordered the razing and total destruction of the chateau. In the ensuing conflagration the Plantard family is said to have lost all its possessions." - 31:177

_________________
************


Last edited by rain on 20 Oct 2009 9:46 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 9:44 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
lovuian wrote:
Yes Roscoe
Louvain and Lovuian
is a play on the letters

:wink:

And yes look at Agrippa's famous saying
very close to my signature

He said: "Nothing is concealed from the wise and sensible, while the unbelieving and unworthy cannot learn the secrets." He emphasized: "All things which are similar and therefore connected, are drawn to each other's power." This is known as the law of resonance.

My signature is
Everything is connected and there are no coincidences

One of my favorite works of his

# Declamatio de nobilitate et praecellentia foeminei sexus (Declamation on the Nobility and Preeminence of the Female Sex, 1529[1]), a book pronouncing the theological and moral superiority of women. Edition with English translation, London 1670[2]

:lol: :lol: :lol:


Agrippa was all about secrets and so was Dee
they were tapping into many forces


Then you'll know what Agrippa calls Saint Michael.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 9:46 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
Ivaldi wrote:
Roscoe your picture is of a terrestial astrolabe, as opposed to a celestial astrolabe.

They are basically the same device, and some early astrolabes had two sides for celestial and terrestial, or interchangeable plates. They allow the calculation of lattitude, but unfortunately they don't overcome the problem of calculating longitude at sea which requires a chronograph.

The Rennes-le-Chateau and Bornholm landscape layouts would have provided the necessary observations to calculate the size of the Earth, and fix the legth of measures such as the mile, and perform the observations needed to calibrate an astrolabe, which despite its limitations was a revolutionary device in C12th Europe.

IMNSHO Bornholm and RLC layouts could also enable calcuation of the difference in longitude between fixed points such as between Bourges and Delphi. However they were not portable.

Although with determination, sticking close to land when possible, and taking a compass bearing in open expanses of water you could get to most places. It worked for the Vikings.


Perhaps you should look at this.

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 10:10 am 
Offline
Queen Bee
User avatar

Joined: 02 Dec 2006 3:44 pm
Posts: 7750
rain wrote:

It sounds like they're calling him a communist slut who wants to be King. This is worthy of Shakespeare. :lol:


Would that be William Shakespeare or perhaps a (female) imposter? :wink:

_________________
Image
CROMLECK DE RENNES is here.
It's the SUN


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 20 Oct 2009 10:12 am 
Offline
Emperor
User avatar

Joined: 22 Jun 2009 10:28 pm
Posts: 5433
Location: NA
Would that be William Shakespeare or perhaps a (female) imposter?

No Bacon, he supposedly only had her for one season. :wink:

_________________
************


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group